People with Dirty Hands: The Passion for Gardening

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Wiley, Jan 22, 1996 - Gardening - 206 pages
12 Reviews
People with Dirty Hands Why do some people have their hands in dirt? What causes someone to become obsessed with the process of growing something, whether it be a tangle of flowers, chiles hot enough to make your eyes water, or a rambling rose plucked from a tumbledown house? Author Robin Chotzinoff took a road trip (several, actually) across America to find the answers. People with Dirty Hands is what she found. It rings with the voices of people singularly possessed: Margaret Sharpe and Pam Puryear, founders of the Texas Rose Rustlers; Doug Beck, president of California Garden Ladies, who harvests hibernating ladybugs from their leafy beds for commercial sale; and Bill Palmer, whose garden is home to 450 tomato plants, simply because "You really can't buy a tomato." In vivid style, Chotzinoff captures the all-encompassing fervor—and hope—that can drive a person to create a vegetable garden from a concrete, hypodermic-strewn landscape or to plant seed while snow still threatens. It is the immutable promise of life.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

Well, from my snow-bound apartment this December, I really wanted to like this. But it just didn't work for me. For one thing, it was too superficial. There were themed sections, but each covered so ... Read full review

Review: People with Dirty Hands: The Passion for Gardening

User Review  - Elizabeth Rhea - Goodreads

A delightful read-- a meandering narrative that makes you feel like you're riding shotgun with the author on her fascinating adventure. Immersive Journalism done right!! Read full review

Contents

Introduction
11
Rustling Roses
20
Heat
33
Copyright

10 other sections not shown

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About the author (1996)

Robin Chotzinoff is a staff writer for Denver's Westword and a contributor to Garden Design magazine, and she has written for New Republic and Outside. She lives with her daughter and her boyfriend in a log cabin outside Denver, where she gardens at 7,000 feet.

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