The New Complete System of Arithmetic: Composed for the Use of the Citizens of the United States

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D. Carlisle, 1802 - Arithmetic - 352 pages
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Page 243 - Divide the difference of the extremes by the common difference, and the quotient increased by 1 is the number of terms.
Page 216 - Find the greatest square number in the first or left hand period, place the root of it at the right hand of the given number, (after the manner of a quotient in division...
Page 12 - I = One. II = Two. III = Three. IV = Four. V = Five. VI = Six. VII = Seven. VIII = Eight. IX = Nine. X = Ten. XI = Eleven.
Page 334 - To find the number of Permutations or changes, that can be made of any given number of things, all different from each other. RULE.
Page 73 - Multiply each numerator into all the denominators, except its own, for a new numerator, and all the denominators into each other continually, for a common denominator.
Page 72 - Multiply all the numerators continually together for a new numerator, and all the denominators for a new denominator, and they will form the simple fraction required.
Page 91 - ... therefore, divide as in whole numbers, and, from the right hand of the quotient, point off so many places for decimals, as the decimal places in the dividend exceed those in the divisor.
Page 216 - Distinguish the given number into periods of two figures each, by putting a point over the place of units, another over the place of hundreds, and so on, which points show the number of figures the root will consist of. 2. Find the greatest square number in the first, or left hand period...
Page 10 - First, commit the words at the head of the table, viz. units, tens,^ hundreds, &c. to memory, then, to the simple value of each figure, join the name of its place, beginning at the left hand, and reading towards the right.
Page 224 - RULE. 1 . Separate the given number into periods of three figures each, by putting a point over the unit figure and every third figure bejond the place of units.

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