The Life of General, the Right Honourable Sir David Baird, Bart. ...

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R. Bentley, 1832 - Generals
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Baird visited the Cape in 1779 and 1797 and was in command of the expedition which captured it in 1806.
 

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Page 341 - They rushed on, driving the French before them, till they were stopped by a wall. Sir John accompanied them in this charge, and told the soldiers that he was " well pleased with their conduct.
Page 339 - Corunna for a time had rendered indispensable to assume, the native and undaunted valour of British troops was never more conspicuous, and must have exceeded what even your own experience of that invaluable quality, so inherent in them, may have taught you to expect. When every one that had an opportunity seemed to vie in improving it, it is difficult for me, in making this report, to select particular instances for your approbation. The corps chiefly engaged were the brigades under Major-Generals...
Page 111 - The shore had been previously very closely inspected by the brigadier, and by his spirited exertions and example, our efforts were crowned with success...
Page 372 - ... he was a father to the poor ; and the cause which he knew not he searched out.
Page 112 - ... the landing ; but the casualties of this service arose principally from natural difficulties ; and it is with the deepest concern I have the honour to inform your lordship that we lost...
Page 336 - Upon the left, the enemy at first contented himself with an attack upon our picquets, which, however, in general maintained their ground. Finding, however, his efforts unavailing on the right and centre, he seemed determined to render the attack upon the left...
Page 338 - Douro afforded the best hope that the south of Spain might be relieved ; but this generous effort to save the unfortunate people also afforded the enemy the opportunity of directing every effort of his numerous troops, and concentrating all his principal resources, for the destruction of the only regular...
Page 337 - The enemy pushed his light troops towards the town soon after eight o'clock in the morning of the 17th, and shortly after occupied the heights of St Lucia, which command the harbour. But, notwithstanding this circumstance, and the manifold defects of the place, there being no apprehension that the...
Page 338 - Circumstances forbid us to indulge the hope, that the victory with which it has pleased Providence to crown the efforts of the army, can be attended with any very brilliant consequences to Great Britain. It is clouded by the loss of one of her best Soldiers. It has been achieved at the termination of a long and harassing service. The superior numbers and advantageous position of the Enemy, not less than the actual situation of this army, did not admit of any advantage being reaped from success. It...
Page 338 - These circumstances produced the necessity of rapid and harassing marches, which diminished the numbers, exhausted the strength, and impaired the equipment of the army. Notwithstanding all these disadvantages, and those more immediately attached to a defensive position, which the imperious necessity of covering the harbour of Corunna for a time had rendered indispensable to assume, the native and undaunted valour of...

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