The Legacy of the French Revolution

Front Cover
Ralph C. Hancock, L. Gary Lambert
Rowman & Littlefield, 1996 - History - 299 pages
0 Reviews
This collection of essays by prominent American and French scholars explores the political, cultural, and social implications of the most fundamentally formative modern event, the French Revolution. The contributors contend that the vocabulary and spirit of the French Revolution has exercised greater influence on the modern world than the more moderate and by all appearances more successful American Revolution. The Legacy of the French Revolution delineates the distinctive characters of the American and French revolutions and analyzes the different variants of democratic political traditions that have evolved from this seminal event. This book will be of particular interest to political theorists, political historians, and students of democratic theory.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

The Unfinished Revolution
19
The French Revolution and French and English Liberalism
43
Two Philosophies Two Revolutions
79
The Two Revolutions
81
The American Founding and the French Revolution
109
Human Rights and Constitutional Government A FrancoAmerican Dialogue at the Time of the Revolution
151
The Great Misunderstanding
175
Revolution Constitution Law
187
The Rule of Law in EighteenthCentury Revolutions
189
The Rights of Man and Citizen in the French Constitutional Tradition
199
Revolutionary Visions in Legal Imagery Constitutional Contrasts between France and America
219
Conclusion Two Revolutions and the Problem of Modern Prudence
257
Index
289
About the Contributors
301
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

Ralph C. Hancock is associate professor of political science at Brigham Young University.

L. Gary Lambert is associate professor of French at the same university.

Bibliographic information