Evil and Suffering in Jewish Philosophy

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 10, 1997 - Religion - 272 pages
The problems of evil and suffering have been extensively discussed in Jewish philosophy, and much of the discussion has centred on the Book of Job. In this new study Oliver Leaman poses two questions: how can a powerful and caring deity allow terrible things to happen to obviously innocent people, and why has the Jewish people been so harshly treated throughout history, given its status as the chosen people? He explores these issues through an analysis of the views of Philo, Saadya, Maimonides, Gersonides, Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Hermann Cohen, Buber, Rosenzweig, and post-Holocaust thinkers, and suggests that a discussion of evil and suffering is really a discussion about our relationship with God. The Book of Job is thus both the point of departure and the point of return.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Job
19
Philo
33
Saadya
48
Maimonides
64
Gersonides
102
Spinoza
121
Mendelssohn
146
Cohen
157
Buber
165
The Holocaust
185
Back to the Bible
220
Bibliography
251
Further reading
253
Index
255
Copyright

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