An Historical Review of the Constitution and Government of Pennsylvania: From Its Origin, So Far as Regards the Several Points of Controversy, which Have, from Time to Time, Arisen Between the Several Governors of that Province, and Their Several Assemblies : Founded on Authentic Documents

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R. Griffiths, 1759 - Constitutional history - 444 pages
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Page 13 - I choose to solve the controversy with this small distinction, and it belongs to all three: any government is free to the people under it (whatever be the frame) where the laws rule and the people are a party to those laws, and more than this is tyranny, oligarchy, or confusion.
Page 9 - Provided, nevertheless, that the same laws be consonant to reason, and not repugnant or contrary, but (as near as conveniently may be) agreeable to the laws and statutes and rights of this our kingdom of England...
Page 219 - That all aids and supplies, and aids to His Majesty in Parliament, are the sole gift of the Commons ; and all Bills for the granting of any such aids and supplies ought to begin with the Commons ; and that it Is the undoubted and sole right of the Commons to direct, limit, and appoint in such Bills the ends, purposes, considerations, conditions, limitations, and qualifications of such grants, which ought not to be changed or altered by the House of Lords.
Page 44 - THAT no Person or Persons shall or may, at any Time hereafter, be obliged to answer any Complaint, Matter or Thing whatsoever, relating to Property, before the Governor and Council, or in any other Place, but in ordinary Course of Justice, unless Appeals thereunto shall be hereafter by Law appointed.
Page 44 - And no act, law, or ordinance whatsoever shall at any time hereafter be made or done to alter, change, or diminish the form or effect of this charter, or of any part or clause therein, contrary to the true intent and meaning thereof, without the consent of the Governor for the time being and six parts of seven of the Assembly met.
Page 258 - And again, in his Letter of May the Twentieth, "i have only Time to thank you once more, in the Name of the General, and every body concerned, for the Service you have done; which has been conducted throughout with the greatest Prudence and most generous Spirit for the Public Service.
Page 404 - Comnitees; prepare Bills in order to pafs into Laws; impeach Criminals, and redrefs Grievances ; and fhall have all other Powers and Privileges of an Affembly, according to the Rights of the free-born Subjects of England, and as is ufual in any of the King's Plantations in America.
Page 260 - If the general ever wrote differently of us to the King's ministers, it must have been while he was under the first impressions given him by the governor to our...
Page 83 - ... our enemies. Power, like water, is ever working its own way, and wherever it can find or make an opening, is altogether as prone to overflow whatever is subject to it. And though matter of right, overlooked, may be reclaimed and re-assumed at any time, it cannot be too soon reclaimed and re-assumed.

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