Gazetteer of the Kangra District: 1883

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Calcutta Central Press Company Limited, 1883 - Kāngra (India : District) - 500 pages
 

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Page 117 - A Mian, to preserve his name and honour unsullied, must scrupulously observe four fund-imental maxims : — He must never drive the plough ; he must never give his daughter in marriage to an inferior, nor marry himself much below bis rank ; he must never accept money in exchange for the betrothal of his daughter ; and his female household must observe strict seclusion.
Page 5 - presents such sublime and delightful contrasts. Below lies the plain, a picture of rural loveliness and repose ; the surface is covered with the richest cultivation, irrigated by streams which descend from perennial snows, and interspersed with homesteads buried in the midst of groves and fruit trees. Turning from this scene of peaceful beauty, the stern and majestic hills confront us ; their sides are furrowed with precipitous water-courses; forests of oak clothe their flanks, and higher up give...
Page 123 - ... with little or no hair on their faces. Both men and women have coarse features, more resembling the Tartar physiognomy than any other type, and it is rare to see a handsome face, though sometimes the younger women may be called pretty. Both sexes are extremely addicted to spirituous drinks. Although industrious cultivators, they are very litigious and quarrelsome ; but their disputes seldom lead to blows ; and though intemperate they are still thrifty, — a Ghirth seldom wastes his substance...
Page 329 - Without a lord paramount, and with no bond of confederacy, such diminutive states could never have existed side by side for any length of time. It is pretty certain, therefore, that with short intervals of complete independence in periods of confusion, they must have been more or less subject and tributary to some superior power.
Page 99 - On the border line in the Himalayas, between Tibet and India proper, any one can observe caste growing before his eyes ; the noble is changing into a Rajput, the priest into a Brahman, the peasant into a Jat, and so on down to the bottom of the scale. The same process was, I believe, more or less in force in Kangra proper down to a period not very remote from to-day.
Page 274 - Corrupt judgments, or an insufficient police, were evils which might be overlooked even supposing they excited attention ; but a Kardar in arrears was an offender almost beyond the hope of pardon. The problem of his life was therefore to maintain cultivation at the highest possible level, and at the same time to keep the cultivator at the lowest point of depression.
Page 119 - However, the prospect of starvation has already driven many to take the plough, and the number of seceders daily increases. Our administration, though just and liberal, has a levelling tendency. Service is no longer to be procured, and to many the stern alternative has arrived of taking to agriculture and securing comparative comfort, or enduring the pangs of hunger and death. So long as any resource remains the fatal step will be postponed, but it is easy to see that the struggle cannot be long...
Page 118 - ... his female household must observe strict " seclusion. The prejudice against the plough is perhaps the most inveterate of all ; that step can " never be recalled. The offender at once loses the privileged salutation ; he is reduced to the second ' grade of Rajputs ; no Mian will marry his daughter, and he must go a step lower in the social scale to get a wife for himself. In every occupation of life he is made to feel his degraded position. In meetings of the tribe and at marriages...
Page 349 - Rashi is often added as a qualification by any one pretending himself to unmixed blood. In the absence of other children they are their father's full heirs; but in the presence of other children by a...
Page 123 - ... course of construction. From these details it will be perceived that the Ghirths have no easy time of it, and their energies and powers of endurance must be most elastic to bear up against this incessant toil. To look at their frames, they appear incapable of sustaining such fatigue. The men are short in stature, frequently disfigured by goitre (which equally affects both sexes), dark and sickly in complexion, and with little or no hair on their faces. Both men and women have coarse features,...

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