Sons and Lovers

Front Cover
David Herbert Lawrence, Helen Baron, Carl Baron
Penguin, 1994 - Fiction - 497 pages
Lawrence's first major novel was also the first in the English language to explore ordinary working-class life from the inside. No writer before or since has written so well about the intimacies enforced by a tightly knit mining community and by a family where feelings are never hidden for long.

When the marriage between Walter Morel and his sensitive, high-minded wife begins to break down, the bitterness of their frustration seeps into their children's lives. Their second son, Paul, craves the warmth of family and community, but knows that he must sacrifice everything in the struggle for independence if he is not to repeat his parents' failure.

Lawrence's powerful description of Paul's single-minded efforts to define himself sexually and emotionally through relationships with two women -- the innocent, old-fashioned Miriam Leivers and the experienced, provocatively modern Clara Dawes -- makes this a novel as much for the beginning of the twenty-first century as it was for the beginning of the twentieth.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

SONS AND LOVERS

User Review  - Kirkus

When Sons and Lovers was first seen by its reading public in 1913, its publishers had in fact, out of caution and timidity, shortened Lawrence's originally submitted version by about ten percent—cuts ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Este livro é uma forma de mostra varios casos ocorridas por muitas pessoas hoje,muitas mães ficam tão presas aos filhos que acaba sufocando a propria vida deles,elas querem o melhor para eles,mas torna a vida deles uma prisão ao qual só existe ela (a mãe),sra.morel é um caso disso, seu amor pelos seus filhos impediu que eles fossem felizes com suas amadas, seu filho mais velho estava preste a se casar,mas sua mãe com medo de perdelo envenena_o com suas palavras,alias palavra de mãe e sagrada,entao ele desiste de se casar e acaba morrendo.
Então a atenção da sra.morel vira para seu segundo filho,que tambem estava apaixonado por uma bela mulher,que acaba se casando com ela.
Mas sra.morel não tinha culpa de ter tanto amor pelos seus filhos querendo eles só para ela,na verdade ela sofreu muito pois seu marido era álcoolatra então ela sempre sofria muito com esse conssumismo que ele tinha pelo ácool, ela tentava substituir seu amor pelo marido,com seus filhos!
O titulo dessa obra é filhos e amantes,além deles serem filhos eles tinha que ter dois amores sua mãe e sua namorada.
Ao qual a namorada era a amante!
 

Contents

VIII
9
IX
37
XI
61
XIII
82
XV
108
XVII
141
XIX
173
XX
218
XXVII
345
XXVIII
386
XXIX
423
XXX
454
XXXI
465
XXXII
477
XXXIII
489
XXXIV
491

XXII
255
XXIV
295
XXV
322
XXXV
496
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xix - It follows this idea: a woman of character and refinement goes into the lower class, and has no satisfaction in her own life. She has had a passion for her husband, so the children are born of passion, and have heaps of vitality.

About the author (1994)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

Bibliographic information