Idle Ideas in 1905

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Hurst and Blackett, 1906 - Wit and humor - 307 pages
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Page 131 - I fall in love with Dora, "" Mr. Barkis goes out with the tide, " "My child wife," "Traadles in a nest of roses"— pages of my own life recur to me, so many of my sorrows, so many of my joys, are woven in my mind with this chapter or the other. That day — how well I remember it! I read of David's wooing, but Dora's death I was careful to skip. Poor, pretty little Mrs. Copperfield...
Page 148 - They have no miscon[66] ceptions concerning the blind Frankenstein into which they are breathing life. He will crush them, — they know it ; but with them he will crush the injustice and stupidity they have grown to hate better than they love themselves. The Russian peasant, when he rises, will prove more terrible, more pitiless than were the men of 1790. He is less intelligent, more brutal.
Page 235 - The new school of military dispatch-writers may succeed in turning even the laughter of the mob against it. The present trouble in the East would never have occurred but for the white man's enthusiasm for bearing other people's burdens. What we call the yellow danger is the fear that the yellow man may before long request us, so far as he is concerned, to put his particular burden down. It may occur to him that, seeing it is his property, he would just as soon carry it himself.
Page 146 - They strike the stranger as a child-like people, but [64] you are possessed with a haunting sense of ugly traits beneath. The workers — slaves it would be almost more just to call them — allow themselves to be driven with the uncomplaining patience of intelligent animals. Yet every educated Russian you talk to on the subject knows that revolution is coming. But he talks to you about it with the door shut, for no man in Russia can be sure that his own servants are not police spies. I was discussing...
Page 9 - ... way I had not at all anticipated. My fabric of hassocks suddenly gave way ; down I fell, and with difficulty prevented myself from being precipitated into the arms of my congregation ; who, I must say, behaved very well, and recovered their gravity sooner than I could have expected. But my adventure was not so bad as that of a friend of mine. A tame raven had got into the church ; no sooner did he begin his sermon, than the raven, in high caw, rushed at his book, seized it in his bill, and had...
Page 60 - It has been said so often as to have become a common-place in educational discussions, that education does not consist in cramming facts. I' am advocating no Gradgrind style of useful knowledge, but the very opposite.
Page 309 - FOLLY AND FRESH AIR. By EDEN PHILLPOTS, Author of "The Human Boy," " My Laughing Philosopher,
Page 309 - One Vol., crown 8vo. Price 3s. 6d. THE SECOND THOUGHTS OF AN IDLE FELLOW. By JEROME K. JEROME, Author of "Three Men in a Boat,
Page 148 - The men who today are working for revolution in Russia number among their ranks statesmen, soldiers, delicately nurtured women, rich landowners, prosperous tradesmen, students familiar with the lessons of history. They have no misconceptions concerning the blind Frankenstein into which they are breathing life. He will crush them - they know it; but with them he will crush the injustice and stupidity they have grown to hate better than they love themselves. The Russian peasant, when he rises, will...
Page 147 - It is a mistake to speak of the Russian classes opposing to all progress a dead wall of selfishness. The history of Russia will be the history of the French Revolution over again, but with this difference : that the educated classes, the thinkers, who are pushing forward the dumb masses are doing so with their eyes open. There will be no Maribeau, no Danton to be appalled at a people's ingratitude.