Ghardaia: Or, Ninety Days Among the B'ni Mozab: Adventures in the Oasis of the Desert of Sahara

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G. P. Putnam & Sons, 1871 - Arabs - 348 pages
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Page 315 - The hunters set forth with small skins of water strapped under their horses' bellies, and a scanty allowance of food for four or five days distributed judiciously about their saddles. The Ostrich generally lives in companies of from four to six individuals, which do not appear to be in the habit, under ordinary circumstances, of wandering more than twenty or thirty miles from their head-quarters.
Page 315 - ... the greatest feat of hunting to which the Saharan sportsman aspires, and in richness of booty it ranks next to the plunder of a caravan. But such prizes are not to be obtained without cost and toil, and it is generally estimated that the capture of an ostrich must be at the sacrifice of the life of a horse or two. So wary is the bird, and so vast are the plains over which it roams, that no ambuscades or artifices can be employed, and the vulgar resource of dogged perseverance is the only mode...
Page 260 - She is represented lying on her side with her head to the south and her face to the west. Both thighs are straight, but the left leg is bent backwards underneath the right leg.
Page 2 - Congress, in the year 1871, by GP PUTNAM & SONS, In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.
Page 315 - ... bird, and so vast are the plains over which it roams, that no ambuscades or artifices can be employed, and the vulgar resource of dogged perseverance is the only mode of pursuit. The horses undergo a long and painful training ; abstinence from water as much as possible, and a diet of dry dates, being considered the best means for strengthening their wind. The hunters of the tribes to the east of the M'zab set forth with small skins of water strapped under their horses' bellies, and a scanty allowance...
Page 347 - Fram's little petroleum launch pitilessly awaited me. Behind me lay all I held dear in life. And what before me? How many years would pass ere I should see it all again? What would I not have given at that moment to be able to turn back, but up at the window little Liv was sitting clapping her hands. Happy child, little do you know what life is— how strangely mingled and how full of change.
Page 162 - When the head of the French column arrived there, it was the middle of the day, and the soldiers were terribly exhausted with the heat. On their left were hills, and on their right a marsh formed by the Makta ; and the passage between was so narrow, that the carriages which contained the ammunition and the wounded could only pass singly. In this conjuncture the Emir launched his troops upon the column, and struck a panic into the whole force. Only one carriage, containing wounded, was saved ; the...
Page 315 - When descried, two or three of the hunters follow the herd, at a gentle gallop, endeavouring merely to keep the birds in sight without alarming them or driving them at full speed, when they would soon be lost to view. The rest of the pursuers leisurely proceed in a direction at right angles to the course which the Ostriches have taken, knowing by experience their habit of running in a circle.
Page 335 - Arab hakeem — among them, that, if bitten by the cerastes, the patient has only to cut off the head of a dabb, make an incision in his own scalp and apply the lizard, when the virus will infallibly be drawn out by its attraction and absorbed.

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