Wilson and China: A Revised History of the Shandong Question

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M.E. Sharpe, 2002 - Political Science - 227 pages
Drawing on sources in Japanese, Chinese, and American archives and libraries, this book reassesses another facet of Woodrow Wilson's agenda at the 1919 Paris Peace Conference at the end of World War I. Breaking with accepted scholarly opinions, the author argues that Wilson did not "betray" China, as many Chinese and Western scholars have charged; rather, Wilson successfully negotiated a compromise with the Japanese to ensure that China's sovereignty would be respected in Shandong Province. Rejecting the compromise, Chinese negotiators refused to sign the Treaty of Versailles, creating conditions for the Soviet Union's entry into China and its later influence over the course of the Chinese revolution.
 

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Contents

VII
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VIII
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IX
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XIII
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XIV
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLIX
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LI
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LII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXVII
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XXXIX
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XLI
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LIII
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LIV
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LVI
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LVIII
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LIX
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LXXV
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LXXVI
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LXXVII
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LXXVIII
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LXXIX
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LXXX
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LXXXI
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Page 12 - As Premier of Japan, I have stated and I now again state to the people of America and of the world that Japan has no ulterior motive, no desire to secure more territory, no thought of depriving China or other peoples of anything which they now possess.
Page 18 - Republic that it cannot recognize any agreement or undertaking, which has been entered into or which may be entered into between the Governments of China and Japan impairing the treaty rights of the United States and its citizens in China, the political or territorial integrity of the Republic of China or the international policy relative to China commonly known as the Open Door Policy.

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