John Ploughman's Pictures: Or, More of His Plain Talk for Plain People

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H. Altemus, 1896 - Conduct of life - 219 pages
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John Ploughman'S Pictures: Or, More of His Plain Talk for Plain People by Charles Haddon Spurgeon, first published in 1896, is a rare manuscript, the original residing in one of the great libraries of the world. This book is a reproduction of that original, which has been scanned and cleaned by state-of-the-art publishing tools for better readability and enhanced appreciation.

Restoration Editors' mission is to bring long out of print manuscripts back to life. Some smudges, annotations or unclear text may still exist, due to permanent damage to the original work. We believe the literary significance of the text justifies offering this reproduction, allowing a new generation to appreciate it.

 

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Page 191 - ... godliness hath promise of the life that now is," as well as of that which is to come.
Page 215 - Mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam. Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home; A charm from the sky seems to hallow us there, Which, seek through the world, is ne'er met with elsewhere. Home, Home, sweet, sweet Home ! There's no place like Home...
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Page 82 - ... with a good conscience. He is sensible of no calamity but the burning a stack of corn, or the overflowing of a meadow, and thinks Noah's flood the greatest plague that ever was, not because it drowned the world, but spoiled the grass. For death he is never troubled, and if he get in but his harvest before, let it come when it will, he cares not.
Page 88 - If I were a cobbler, it would be my pride The best of all cobblers to be; If I were a tinker, no tinker beside Should mend an old kettle like me.
Page 163 - How bitter that cup, No heart can conceive, Which He drank quite up, That sinners might live. His way was much rougher And darker than mine. Did...
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Page 218 - Two birds within one nest; Two hearts within one breast; Two spirits in one fair, Firm league of love and prayer, Together bound for aye, together blest. An ear that waits to catch A hand upon the latch; A step that hastens its sweet rest to win; A world of care without, A world of strife shut out, A world of love shut in.
Page 128 - Who judgeth evil, God them amend; To judge the best therefore intend, For I am as I am and so will I end. Yet some there be that take delight To judge folks

About the author (1896)

Charles Haddon Spurgeon was born in Kelvedon, Essex, England on June 19, 1834. His father and his grandfather were both pastors and at the age of twenty, he became the pastor of the New Park Street Church in London. The congregation quickly grew out of the building and moved to Exeter Hall. In 1861, the congregation moved to the newly constructed Metropolitan Tabernacle. During his lifetime, he published over thirty-five hundred sermons that filled 63 volumes. His series stands as the largest set of books by a single author in the history of Christianity. He also wrote Ploughman's Talk and The Treasury of David. During his last years, he suffered severe physical pain from a gout attack. He was growing increasing ill and died on January 31, 1892.

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