Chronicles of the Canongate

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Classic Books Company, 2001 - 456 pages
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Set within a framing narrative, these three stories take place in the years following the Jacobite defeat and feature characters who are leaving Scotland to seek their fortunes elsewhere. In two of Walter Scott's best-known tales, "The Highland Widow" and "The Two Drovers," two young men are torn between traditional Scottish loyalties and the opportunities offered by England. "The Surgeon's Daughter" follows three young Scots to India during the first years of the British Empire. All three highlight Scott's unique gift for re-creating the spirit of historical eras and painting stirring portraits of Scottish people.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
xi
APPENDIX TO INTRODUCTION
xxxviii
INTRODUCTORY
3
IN WHICH MR CROFTANGRY CONTINUES
21
MR CROFTANGRY INTER ALIA REVISITS
33
MRS BALIOL ASSISTS MB CBOFTANGBY IN
99
THE HIGHLAND WIDOW
199
THE TWO DROVERS
217
MY AUNT MARGARETS MIRROR
267
THE TAPESTRIED CHAMBER
325
DEATH OF THE LAIRDS JOCK
353
NOTES
365
GLOSSARY
384

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Page xxxv - He either fears his fate too much, Or his deserts are small, Who dares not put it to the touch, To gain or lose it all.
Page l - Good my lord, will you see the players well bestowed ? Do you hear, let them be well used, for they are the abstract and brief chronicles of the time : after your death you were better have a bad epitaph than their ill report while you live.

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About the author (2001)

Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 15, 1771. He began his literary career by writing metrical tales. The Lay of the Last Minstrel, Marmion, and The Lady of the Lake made him the most popular poet of his day. Sixty-five hundred copies of The Lay of the Last Minstrel were sold in the first three years, a record sale for poetry. His other poems include The Vision of Don Roderick, Rokeby, and The Lord of the Isles. He then abandoned poetry for prose. In 1814, he anonymously published a historical novel, Waverly, or, Sixty Years Since, the first of the series known as the Waverley novels. He wrote 23 novels anonymously during the next 13 years. The first master of historical fiction, he wrote novels that are historical in background rather than in character: A fictitious person always holds the foreground. In their historical sequence, the Waverley novels range in setting from the year 1090, the time of the First Crusade, to 1700, the period covered in St. Roman's Well (1824), set in a Scottish watering place. His other works include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, and The Bride of Lammermoor. He died on September 21, 1832.

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