Queen Hynde, a poem

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Page 111 - Jura's fair bosom, form'd and full ; The dark and shapeless groups of Mull ; Others far north, in haze that sink, Proud Nevis, on Lochaber's brink, And blue Cruachan, bold and riven, In everlasting coil with heaven. View all the scene, and view it well. Consult thy memory, and tell If on the earth exists the same, Or one so well deserves the name...
Page 49 - Be my indignant oath forgiven ! For, by thy vales of light I swear, And all the saints that sojourn there, If ever again a female eye, That pole-star of iniquity, Shed its dire influence through our fane, In it no longer I remain. . " Were God for trial here to throw Man's ruthless and eternal foe, And ask -with -which I would contend...
Page 367 - Yet neither in field, nor in flowery heath, In heaven above, nor in earth beneath, In star, nor in moon, nor in midnight wind, His elvish Queen could her minstrel find. But now I have found thee, thou vagrant thing, Though where I neither dare say nor sing ; For it was in a home, so passing fair, That an angel of light might have...
Page 364 - O'er fancy's region that reign'st supreme ; Thou lovely Queen , of beauty most bright, And of everlasting new delight, Of foible, of freak, of gambol, and glee, Of all that pleases, And all that...
Page 367 - And looked to a twinkling star for thee, That nightly mounted the orient sheen, Streaming in purple and glowing in green; And thought, as I eyed its changing sphere, My Fairy Queen might sojourn there. Then would I sigh and turn me around, And lay my ear to the hollow ground, To the little air-springs of central birth, That bring low murmurs out of the earth; And there would I listen, in breathless way. Till I heard the worm creep through the clay, And the little blackamoor pioneer...
Page 444 - The appointed time for these sacrifices," says Mallet (North. Ant. ch. vi.), " was always determined by a superstitious opinion which made the northern nations regard the number ' three ' as sacred and particularly dear to the gods. Thus, in every ninth month they renewed the bloody ceremony, which was to last nine days, and every day they offered up nine living victims, whether men or animals. But the most solemn sacrifices were those which were offered...
Page 43 - But little ween d the fairy's skill, He tried what was impossible ! His flush of wrath, and glance unkind, Were anodynes unto her mind. Then she would look demure, and sigh, And sink in graceful courtesy; Press both her hands on her fair breast, And look what could not be exprest! When o'er his frame her glance would stray, He wist not what to do or eay!
Page 363 - And ragged coat, with its waving wings. Yet aye my heart beat light and high When an air of heaven, in passing by, Breathed on the mellow chords; and then I knew it was no earthly strain, 10 But note of wild mysterious kind, From some blest land of unbodied mind.
Page 50 - Dhu, As from the strand the boat withdrew. Lachlan was he whom Wene address'd, Whose temple her soft hand had press'd ; Whose beard she caught with flippant grace, And smiled upon his sluggish face. A burning sigh his bosom drew! 'Angels indeed!
Page 113 - O'er these wild valleys, west away, Where first, by many a trackless strand, The Caledonian held command ; Where ancient Lorn, from northern shores Of Clyde to where Olen-Connel roars, Presents in frowning majesty Her thousand headlands to the sea ; 0 traveller ! whomsoe'er thou art, Turn not aside, with timid heart, At Connal's tide, but journey on To the old site of Beregon ; 1 pledge my word, whether thou...

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