Heidegger, Education, and Modernity

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Michael A. Peters
Rowman & Littlefield, 2002 - Education - 257 pages
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Martin Heidegger is, perhaps, the most controversial philosopher of the twentieth-century. Little has been written on him or about his work and its significance for educational thought. This unique collection by a group of international scholars reexamines Heidegger's work and its legacy for educational thought. Thematically, the collection focuses on Heidegger's critique of modernity and contributors investigate the central significance for education of Heidegger's ontology and his investigation of the question of the meaning of Being by examining his 'art of teaching' (a translation of his submission to the denazification hearing), his view of science and reason, his philosophy of technology, his poetics, and the implications of his thought for learning. These essays point to the crucial importance of Heidegger's work for understanding modern, highly-technologized forms of education and for the possibilities of redemption from its worst excesses.

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Contents

Heidegger on the Art of Teaching
27
Truth Science Thinking and Distress
47
Martin Heidegger Transcendence and the Possibility
65
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Michael A. Peters is research professor in the Faculty of Education at the University of Glasgow.

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