The Origin of Attic Comedy

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Contents

INTRODUCTORY 1 The Data for Inquiry
1
The Structure of an Aristophanic Play
2
Some current Theories of the Origin of Comedy
3
Marriage and Kdmos
8
The Problem of the final Marriage
16
The Sacred Marriage
18
The New Ood and the New King
20
The New Zeus in the Birds
21
Ritual Combats for fertility
111
The Sophistic Antilogy
114
The mediaeval Debat
117
the Parabasis
120
The Form of the Parabasis
121
The Anapaests
122
The Second Part of the Parabasis
124
The Parabasis of the Lysistrata
125

The Sacred Marriage of Dionysus and the Queen at Athens
24
The New Zeus in the Plutus
25
Trygaeus as BeUerophon in the Peace
27
The New Zeus in the Clouds
28
The New King in the Knights and the Frogs
31
The Women Plays
33
THE PHALLIC SONGS 16 Aristotles Statements about the Origin of Comedy
35
The Phallic Song in the Acharnians
37
The form and content of the Phallic Song
38
The PhaUophori Ilhyphalli Autokabdali
41
The same elements in the Parabasis
45
The incompleteness of Aristotles statement
46
The essential content of phallic rites
48
The transition to ritual drama
51
SOME TYPES OF DRAMATIC FERTILITY RITUAL PAGE 25 Classification of types
53
The Fight of Summer and Winter
56
The Young and the Old King
57
The Death and Resurrection type
58
Survivals of these rites in folk plays
60
Description of the English Mummers Play
61
The Festival Plays in Northern Greece
62
The ancient Armed Dance
65
The Fight of Xanthus and Melanthus
66
AGON SACRIFICE AND FEAST 36 The Agon contrasted with the struggle of the romantic plot
70
The Characters in the Agon
71
The Form of the Agon
72
A dramatised debate
73
The Agones in the Plays
75
Summary and conclusions
83
The Resurrection Motive
84
The Frogs and the Peace
85
The Rejuvenation of Demos in the Knights
87
Rejuvenation in other plays
90
The Sacrifice and the Feast
93
Sacrifice and Feast in the Plays
94
The Significance of the Sacrifice and Feast
99
The scattering of sweetmeats to the spectators 49 Conclusion
103
THE CHORUS IN AOON AND PARABASIS 50 The part of the Chorus in the Agon
105
The Function of the comic Chorus
107
Antichoria and Epiirhematic structure
109
Choral matches in abuse alaxpoKoylai
110
The Parabasis a Choral Agon
128
The Second Parabasis
130
Epirrhematic and Episodic composition
131
THE IMPOSTOR 65 The unwelcome Intruders
132
The Impostors in the Plays
133
The Eiron and the Alazon
136
The Minor Buffoon
139
Who is the Impostor t
140
The Impostor scenes as Episodes
141
71
142
72
144
73
148
The Impostor in the Dragonslaying myths
152
75
154
Lamachus 77 The Learned Doctor Socrates
156
Euripides
162
Aeschylus 80 The Cook the Sausageseller Agoracritus 81 The Parasite Clean
166
The absence of individual characterisation
168
83
171
84
174
85
175
87
177
The Peloponnesian Mime and its derivatives
179
The Stock Masks in Vulgar Comedy
181
90
183
The Stock Masks in the AteUane farce 91 The Affinities of these forms of drama
185
How does such a set of stock masks originate f 154
187
93
190
94
192
99
200
100
201
The germs of Tragedy and Comedy in the original ritual
207
103
212
The History of the Old Comedy
215
Synopsis of the extant Flays
221
Bibliography
244
156
247
164
248
168
249
187
250

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Page 244 - If tragedy and comedy are based on the same ritual outlines," Cornford concludes, "the Satyr-play at the end of the tetralogy must stand for the sacred marriage and its Komos, which form the finale of Comedy." But the point here, as it is very much Cornford's, is that the finale of comedy bears no organic relationship to the body of comedy.

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