The Monthly Review

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Hurst, Robinson, 1832 - Books
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Page 22 - And when the dew that lay was gone up, behold, upon the face of the wilderness there lay a small round thing, as small as the hoar frost on the ground.
Page 493 - Father, thy hand Hath reared these venerable columns, thou Didst weave this verdant roof. Thou didst look down Upon the naked earth, and, forthwith, rose All these fair ranks of trees.
Page 494 - Thyself without a witness, in these shades, Of thy perfections : grandeur, strength and grace Are here to speak of thee. This mighty oak By whose immovable stem I stand and seem Almost annihilated — not a prince In all that proud Old World beyond the deep E'er wore his crown as loftily as he Wears the green coronal of leaves with which Thy hand has graced him.
Page 98 - Saviour comes ! by ancient bards foretold ! Hear Him, ye deaf; and all ye blind, behold ! He from thick films shall purge the visual ray, And on the sightless eyeball pour the day: 'Tis he the obstructed paths of sound shall clear, And bid new music charm th' unfolding ear: The dumb shall sing, the lame his crutch forego, And leap exulting, like the bounding roe.
Page 492 - SPIRIT that breathest through my lattice, thou That cool'st the twilight of the sultry day, Gratefully flows thy freshness round my brow : Thou hast been out upon th.e deep at play, Riding all day the wild blue waves till now, Roughening their crests, and scattering high their spray And swelling the white sail. I welcome thee To the scorched land, thou wanderer of the sea!
Page 176 - O Lord, thou knowest how busy I must be this day. If I forget thee, do not thou forget me.
Page 493 - In music; thou art in the cooler breath That from the inmost darkness of the place Comes, scarcely felt; the barky trunks, the ground, The fresh moist ground, are all instinct with thee.
Page 174 - Pray, Mr. Hampden, who is that man, for I see he is on our side, by his speaking so warmly to-day? " — " That sloven," said Mr. Hampden, prophetically, " whom you see before you, hath no ornament in his speech ; that sloven, I say, if we should ever come to a breach with the king, which God forbid ! in such a case, I say, that sloven will be the greatest man in England.
Page 488 - Thus they discoursed together till late at night; and after they had committed themselves to their Lord for protection, they betook themselves to rest: the pilgrim they laid in a large upper chamber, whose window opened towards the sun-rising: the name of the chamber was Peace, where he slept till break of day, and then he awoke and sang, Where am I now?
Page 387 - Elevated on the high dead limb of some gigantic tree that commands a wide view of the neighbouring shore and ocean, he seems calmly to contemplate the motions of the various feathered tribes that pursue their busy avocations below ; the snow-white gulls slowly winnowing the air ; the busy...

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