The Revolution Wasn't Televised: Sixties Television and Social Conflict

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Lynn Spigel, Michael Curtin
Psychology Press, 1997 - Performing Arts - 361 pages
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Caricatures of sixties television--called a "vast wasteland" by the FCC president in the early sixties--continue to dominate our perceptions of the era and cloud popular understanding of the relationship between pop culture and larger social forces. Opposed to these conceptions, The Revolution Wasn't Televised explores the ways in which prime-time television was centrally involved in the social conflicts of the 1960s. It was then that television became a ubiquitous element in American homes. The contributors in this volume argue that due to TV's constant presence in everyday life, it became the object of intense debates over childraising, education, racism, gender, technology, politics, violence, and Vietnam. These essays explore the minutia of TV in relation to the macro-structure of sixties politics and society, attempting to understand the struggles that took place over representation the nation's most popular communications media during the 1960s.
 

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Contents

introduction
12
home fronts and new frontiers
24
white flight
47
patty duke and teen tv
95
dennis the menace the all american handful
119
institutions of culture
139
the smothers brothers comedy hour
201
the discourse
221
nation and citizenship
245
bubbles blue hair and middle america
265
from old frontier to new frontier
287
the racial struggle
305
abcs cusrerseries
327
television memory
349
contributors
359
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Uses of Television
John Hartley
No preview available - 1999
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About the author (1997)

Michael Curtin is the Duncan and Suzanne Mellichamp Professor of Global Studies in the Department of Film and Media Studies and Director of the Media Industries Project at UC Santa Barbara.Jennifer Holt is Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies and Director of the Media Industries Project at UC Santa Barbara.Kevin Sanson is the Research Director of the Media Industries Project at UC Santa Barbara where he oversees the development of MIP research initiatives and publications.

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