The south of France. East half

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Adam and Charles Black, 1885 - France - 396 pages
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Page vi - In the first place, I would strongly advise every person who goes abroad for the recovery of his health, whatever may be his disease, or to what climate soever he may go, to consider the change as placing him merely in a more favorable situation for the removal of his disease ; in fact, to bear strictly in mind that the beneficial influence of sailing and of climate requires to be aided by such a dietetic regimen and general mode of living, and by such remedial...
Page 254 - ... lengthened form of the body of Christ seems extended by its own weight, while the suppleness and lankness of recent death is finely marked by the manner in which the limbs hang in gentle bending and seem falling to the ground, with the natural disposition of the arms, as if affected by every motion .... the interest of the piece lies in the melancholy but placid countenance of the Saviour, which is lacerated by the crown of thorns,
Page 68 - Within this rocky honeycomb — ' cette ville en monolithe,' as it has been aptly called, for it is literally scooped out of one mountain block — live about two hundred poor people, foddering their wretched goats at carved piscina and stately sideboards, erecting mud-beplastered hovels in the halls of feudal princes.
Page 193 - That, brought on white-winged clouds, have come to dower The arid soil with recreative power. No warrior's tread is echoed by their halls, No warder's challenge on the silence falls. Around, the thrifty peasants ply their toil And pluck in orange groves the scented spoil From trees, that have for purple mountains made A vestment bright of green, and gold inlaid.
Page vi - ... he may go, to consider the change as placing him merely in a more favorable situation for the removal of his disease ; in fact, to bear strictly in mind that the beneficial influence of sailing and of climate requires to be aided by such a dietetic regimen and general mode of living, and by such remedial measures as would have been requisite in his case liad he remained in his own country. All the circumstances requiring attention from the invalid at home should be equally attended to abroad.
Page vii - I have witnessed the injurious effects of a neglect of them too often, not to deem such remarks called for in this place. It was, indeed, matter of surprise to me, during my residence abroad, to observe the manner in which many invalids seemed to lose sight of the object for which they left their own country, — the recovery of their health. This appeared to arise chiefly from too much being expected from climate. " The more common and more injurious deviations from that system of living which an...
Page 40 - Etienne, the manufacture is principally performed on the domestic system in the dwellings of the master weavers, each of whom has usually from two to six or eight looms, which, with their fittings, are generally his own property. Himself and as many of his family as can work are employed on these looms, and frequently also one or more...
Page 199 - ... either on sea or on land, must be bracing, invigorating, stimulating. Such, indeed, are the leading characteristics of the climate of this region — the undercliff of western Europe.
Page 68 - I.-AHLM. and buttresses, and coigns of vantage, sculptured by ancient art into palaces and chapels, battlements and dungeons. Now art and nature are confounded in one ruin. Blocks of masonry lie cheek by jowl with masses of the rough-hewn rock : fallen cavern vaults are heaped round fragments of fan-shaped spandrel and clustered...
Page 371 - ... their pathetic exhortations, the whole assembly, as if impelled by an immediate inspiration, exclaimed with one voice, "It is the will of God...

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