The wandering knight of Dunstanborough castle, and miscellaneous poems

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1822
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Page 51 - Breathes there the man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land ? Whose heart hath ne'er within him burned, As home his footsteps he hath turned, From wandering on a foreign strand...
Page 127 - In this front there is a gate-way, built in a very remarkable style, being the great entrance to the castle : it is formed by a circular arch, with a portico and interior gate...
Page 32 - As if increase of appetite had grown By what it fed on; and yet, within a month, Let me not think on't: Frailty, thy name is woman!
Page 133 - English, at this attack, were so much the stronger, that the Scots were driven back. The Earl of Douglas, who was of a high spirit, seeing his men repulsed, seized a battle-axe with both his hands, like a gallant knight, and, to rally his men, dashed into the midst of his enemies and gave such blows on all around him that no one could withstand them, but all made way for him on every side; for there was none so well armed with helmets and plates but that they suffered from his battle-axe.
Page 132 - ... braved the young hero to engage, and Douglas fell beneath his valorous sword. The rumour of their leader's overthrow ran through the Scottish lines: they were intimidated, and began to fly: but, at the instant the panic was becoming general, and the English were advancing in hopes of victory, the earl of Dunbar came up with a large reinforcement, and the Scots rallied. Now, overpowered by numbers and faint with the fatigues and bloodshed of the fight, the English gave way, and the invaders were...
Page 87 - For me, no more the path invites Ambition loves to tread ; No more I climb those toilsome heights By guileful hope misled ; Leaps my fond fluttering heart no more To Mirth's enlivening strain ; For present pleasure soon is o'er, And all the past is vain.
Page 39 - I am myself indifferent honest; but yet I could accuse me of such things, that it were better, my mother had not borne me: I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious; with more offences at my beck, than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in: What should such fellows as I do crawling between earth and heaven?
Page 81 - ... Tis sculptured with devices o'er, And mottoes of the brave of yore ; But there time's wasting breath hath been, And the winter winds of heaven keen, And the tempest's rush and the drenching ruin, That will not beat for an age in vain, Mouldering the artist's toil away, Wasting all in slow decay. 'Tis of the PERCY'S deathless fame, That dark grey Cross remains to tell ; It bears the PERCY'S honoured name, For near its base the PERCY fell.
Page 133 - ... all around him, that no one could withstand them, but all made way for him on every side. Thus he advanced...
Page 131 - ... horrors, especially when the conflict was hand to hand. Douglas, ambitious of laurels, sought for young Henry Percy, who, for his intrepidity and martial prowess, was named Hotspur. He met him in the hottest of the battle, insolently braved the young hero to engage, and Douglas fell beneath his valorous sword. The rumour of their leader's overthrow ran through the Scottish lines: they were intimidated, and began to fly: but, at the instant the panic was becoming general, and the English were...

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