Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science

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Cambridge University Press, 2001 - Philosophy - 267 pages
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One way to understand science is as a selection process. David Hull, one of the dominant figures in contemporary philosophy of science, sets out in this volume a general analysis of this selection process that applies equally to biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to anitgens, operant learning, and social and conceptual change in science. Science and Selection brings together many of Hull's most important essays on selection (some never before published) in one accessible volume.
 

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Contents

Interactors versus Vehicles
13
Replicators and Interactors
22
Replication
32
Interaction
38
Taking Vehicles Seriously
46
A General Account of Selection Biology Immunology and Behavior
49
2 A Brief Characterization of Selection
53
3 Selection in Biological Evolution
61
A Function for Actual Examples in Philosophy of Science
151
Thought Experiments in Science
153
Thought Experiments in Philosophy of Science
158
Conclusion
164
The Evolution of Conceptual Systems in Science
166
Models of Conceptual Selection in Science
169
Gathering Data to Test Models of Science
174
The Demic Structure of Science
178

4 Somatic Selection in the Immune System
66
5 Operant Selection
75
6 Conclusion
90
Selection in the Evolution of Science
95
A Mechanism and Its Metaphysics An Evolutionary Account of the Social and Conceptual Development of Science
97
Conceptual Inclusive Fitness
101
Selection Processes
109
The Role of Individuality in Selection
112
Science as a Selection Process
115
Disanalogies between Biological and Conceptual Evolution
119
Conceptual Interaction
125
The Type Specimen Method of Reference
127
Conclusion
132
Why Scientists Behave Scientifically
135
Whats Wrong with InvisibleHand Explanations?
139
2 InvisibleHand Explanations in Their Casual Context
140
3 A Social Structure of Science
142
4 InvisibleHand Explanations in Science
144
5 Conclusion
148
Testing Our Views about Science
149
Conclusion
183
Testing Philosophical Claims about Science
185
1 Testing MetaLevel Claims
186
2 Idealizations
188
3 Studying Science
190
4 Operationalizing in the Study of Science
192
5 Normative Claims about Science
194
That Just Dont Sound Right A Plea for Real Examples
196
Biological Species
205
Natural Kinds
213
Conclusion
218
Studying the Study of Science Scientifically
222
Plancks Principle
226
Birth Order and Science
231
The Role of Novel Predictions in Science
233
Conclusion
238
References
243
Index
263
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