Plays and Poems

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G. Routledge, 1887 - 286 pages
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Page 285 - His golden locks time hath to silver turned; O time too swift, O swiftness never ceasing! His youth 'gainst time and age hath ever spurned, But spurned in vain; youth waneth by increasing. Beauty, strength, youth are flowers but fading seen; Duty, faith, love are roots and ever green.
Page 26 - My love is fair, my love is gay, As fresh as bin the flowers in May, And of my love my roundelay, My merry merry merry roundelay, Concludes with Cupid's curse, — They that do change old love for new, Pray gods they change for worse ! BOTH.
Page 81 - Hot sun, cool fire, tempered with sweet air, Black shade, fair nurse, shadow my white hair : Shine sun, burn fire, breathe air and ease me ; Black shade, fair nurse, shroud me and please me ; Shadow (my sweet nurse) keep me from burning, Make not my glad cause, cause of mourning. Let not my beauty's fire Inflame unstaid desire, Nor pierce any bright eye That wandereth lightly.
Page 209 - Gently dip, but not too deep, For fear thou make the golden beard to weep. Fair maid, white and red, Comb me smooth, and stroke my head, And every hair a sheaf shall be, And every sheaf a golden tree.
Page 27 - ... bin the flowers in May, And of my love my roundelay, My merry, merry, merry roundelay, Concludes with Cupid's curse, — They that do change old love for new, Pray gods they change for worse ! Both.
Page 251 - Sea and land Lie open to the voyage you intend ; And sea or land, bold Britons, far or near, Whatever course your matchless virtue shapes, Whether to Europe's bounds or Asian plains, To Afric's shore, or rich America, Down to the shades of deep Avernus' crags, Sail on, pursue your honours to your graves.
Page 82 - And stroke my bosom with the silken fan : This shade (sun-proof) is yet no proof for thee, Thy body smoother than this waveless spring, And purer than the substance of the same, Can creep through that his
Page 180 - Lamp. By my other wife I had a daughter so hardfavoured, so foul, and ill-faced, that I think a grove full of golden trees, and the leaves of rubies and diamonds, would not be a dowry answerable to her deformity. Erest. Well, neighbour, now you have spoke, hear me speak : send them to the well for the water of life ; there shall they find their fortunes unlocked for.
Page 177 - That lived in honour, virtue, love, and fame. But Sacrapant, that cursed sorcerer, Being besotted with my beauteous love My dearest love, my true betrothed wife, Did seek the means to rid me of my life.
Page 73 - This paragon, this only, this is she, In whom do meet so many gifts in one, On whom our country gods so often gaze, In honour of whose name the Muses sing ; In state Queen Juno's peer, for power in arms And virtues of the mind Minerva's mate, As fair and lovely as the Queen of Love, As chaste as Dian in her chaste desires : 90 The same is she, if Phoebe do no wrong, To whom this ball in merit doth belong.

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