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Review: Lolita

Editorial Review - Bookreporter.com

Awe and exhilirationalong with heartbreak and mordant witabound in LOLITA, Nabokov's most famous and controversial novel, which tells the story of the aging Humbert Humbert's obsessive, devouring, and doomed passion for the nymphet Dolores Haze. LOLITA is also the story of a hypercivilized European colliding with the cheerful barbarism of postwar America. Most of all, it is a meditation on lovelove as outrage and hallucination, madness and transformation. Read full review

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Vladimir Nabokov has written a book called “Lolita”. It is a novel from 1955, that has been described as having a “disgusting brilliance”. The protagonist is an unreliable narrator named Humbert Humbert. He, in the end, or after reading it twice, is revealed to be the antagonist. The book centers around Humbert, and the young lady, Dolores Haze who becomes Humbert’s obsession. He names her Lolita, hence the title. The two meet after Humbert is offered to move into Lolita’s (a.k.a. Dolores Haze) house by her mother who proceeds to fall in love with Mr. Humbert. He accepts the offer to stay for the sole purpose of being near Dolores. He starts to write in a journal about interactions with Dolores Haze and her mother. Soon thereafter Ms. Haze confesses her love to him. Haze and Humbert are married and Dolores is, to Humbert’s dismay, shipped off to a summer camp. Humbert puts up with Mrs.Humbert for weeks until she finds the journal that he has written in. It unveils his passion for Lolita as well as his disdain for Mrs. Haze. She is overcome with hatred and storms out of their house to mail letters. In the process of doing this she dies from a car running over her. Humbert checks Dolores out from the summer camp then proceeds to take her on a roadtrip with everyone back home thinking that he is her true father and her mother was involved with him when she was still married to Dolores’ biological father. The man is constantly making up lies, he explains in detail Dolores’ and his trips and how much fun they’ve had. Even though it is obscurely understood that Dolores feels trapped in an unstable world of rape and sadness. As they travel the country Lolita becomes depressed, but only subtle hints are dropped about this throughout the book, as previously mentioned. They settled down in another town not far from where Dolores’ mother's house is being rented out. Dolores starts getting into theater and grows over the next year and then is is uprooted once again. She finds someone that helps her escape Humbert’s grasps. Their identity stays secret until the ending. Although Humbert makes multiple attempts to relocate Lolita he never finds her, so much as she finds him.
This story was overwhelming. There was a lot of fluttery ideas, travelings and lovely nonsense taking place all in the same moment. And a lot of hidden messages that have to be thought over. The book in general carries a very universal, important message that is vital for us to take away from. Although the majority of people refuse to take into consideration the message because they are uncomfortable with it. America’s comfort with placing the blame on innocence in order to avoid seeing the worst in ailing people. The book states clearly, that Humbert has kidnapped, drugged and rapped a minor. Somehow Vladimir leaves us pitying the monster and questioning the faultless loss. This is the issue, and close to no one addresses it. How could you feel bad for this man who is so disgraceful? The last words sends people into a frenzy of madness directed towards Lolita when, in reality, she is not the one to be blamed. Poetic trinkets have a funny way of loosely but quite effectively masking the horrid verity found within these pages. Humbert was a disgusting man, he tortured a young woman and ruined any fatherly image she may of had intact. Nabokov sheds light onto the problems that we have now a days with seeing the wrong. I feel that this book really discloses how we would rather be arrogant then face some cold hard truths. There hasn’t been a more intellectually appealing book I have read yet. The writing is winsom; it is elegiac. Filled with “raw sentiment of great honesty” Even if these parts are only present to disrupt the lies. One must still have a certain appreciation for something so terrifyingly beautiful.
 

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I love this book and the movie was great. I saw the movies first before reading the book. But anyways I thought this was a beautiful sad tragedy and I loved all of it. It had been a while since I read it. Delores is a nice name... Maybe I should name my daughter that. Anyways I loved this book. And if you wanna read something classic. Read this....Became a big obsession to me.  

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Amazing, the depravity of the content only comes to compliment the artistry of the language.

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Lolita
I can understand why this book was controversial at the time it was first published. After having heard about this book for many years, I finally read it. I wanted to be very impressed but I
guess I never really connected with the storyteller. I'm glad I read it, but I won't ever want to read it again. 

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Way too expensive!
I have the paperback version for $5. Don't buy here, buy at a bookstore.

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A Stunningly Beautiful Book
If you're not familiar with Nabokov and his brilliant writing style then you've been missing out -- big time. Not only is he one of the best authors since the likes of Poe
and Byron, but his prose simply gives the reader goosebumps. Lolita is one of the best love stories ever written and should be taken in as such and not as a foul and bestial tale of gruesome desire. It's one of those books that I have many copies of and it travels with me everywhere. It's a delight to indulge in again and again. 

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The second time I read this book, I enjoyed it even more than the first time. It is at times deeply disturbing, blackly humorous and sometimes even tragic. The protagonist is always desperately trying to cling to something fleeting, something he can never truly have and it has quite a tragic effect on his and others lives. The criticisms I have is that parts of the book are quite long and drawn out, also it would have been interesting to have been able to hear Lolita's perspective on things.  

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The only reason I was reading this book was because someone picked it for this month's read in my book club. Needless to say, I will not be attending this month's meeting. I can come up with much better ways to spend what little free time I have reading this poor excuse for a book. I have no desire to read the sick and twisted obsessions of an man wanting a 12-year old girl. The book was hard to follow and I honestly felt repulsed the entire 42 pages I unfortunately did read. I guess I'm just not a literary snob that gets engrossed in this kind of useless crap...just a mere person that likes to read books for entertainment over watching the tube.  

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I "read" this book in the audio version. It was narrated by Jeremy Irons, who played Humboldt in the movie version. I was astounded by the spectacular prose, given by the repellant subject matter.

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