An Essay on the Modern State

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jul 29, 2002 - Philosophy - 318 pages
This important book is the first serious philosophical examination of the modern state. It inquires into the justification of this particular form of political society. It asks whether all states are "nation-states," what are the alternative ways of organizing society, and which conditions make a state legitimate. The author concludes that, while states can be legitimate, they typically fail to have the powers (e.g. sovereignity) that they claim. Christopher Morris has written a book that will command the attention of political philosophers, political scientists, legal theorists, and specialists in international relations.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - thcson - LibraryThing

Before reading this book I was a bit skeptical about its ambitious title, but I was quite pleased with it in the end. The book was more philosophical than I expected, for good and bad. Good, because ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
1
The modern state
14
Social order in anarchy
56
Legitimacy
102
Reasons
114
Justice
136
Sovereignty
172
Boundaries
228
The functions of governments
266
States Pretenses powers prospects
288
Index
299
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information