Selective Remembrances: Archaeology in the Construction, Commemoration, and Consecration of National Pasts

Front Cover
Philip L. Kohl, Mara Kozelsky, Nachman Ben-Yehuda
University of Chicago Press, Nov 15, 2008 - Social Science - 384 pages
0 Reviews
When political geography changes, how do reorganized or newly formed states justify their rule and create a sense of shared history for their people? Often, the essays in Selective Remembrances reveal, they turn to archaeology, employing the field and its findings to develop nationalistic feelings and forge legitimate distinctive national identities.

Examining such relatively new or reconfigured nation-states as Iran, Iraq, Turkey, Israel, Russia, Ukraine, India, and Thailand, Selective Remembrances shows how states invoke the remote past to extol the glories of specific peoples or prove claims to ancestral homelands. Religion has long played a key role in such efforts, and the contributors take care to demonstrate the tendency of many people, including archaeologists themselves, to view the world through a religious lens—which can be exploited by new regimes to suppress objective study of the past and justify contemporary political actions.

The wide geographic and intellectual range of the essays in Selective Remembrances will make it a seminal text for archaeologists and historians.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Archaeology Russian Nationalism and the Arctic Homeland
31
2 The Challenges of Church Archaeology in PostSoviet Crimea
71
Facts and Falsifications
99
4 Archaeology and Nationalism in The History of the Romanians
127
The Near East
161
A Deconstruction of Western Civilization from the Margin
163
The Politics of Archaeology in Modern Iraq
189
The Persian Gulf Archaeologists and the Politics of ArabIranianRelations
206
WestBank Settlers and the Second Stage of National Archaeology
277
Heritage Tourism and Archaeology in Israel
299
Mourning a Dream
326
South and Southeast Asia
347
12 The Aryan Homeland Debate in India
349
13 The Impact of Colonialism and Nationalism in the Archaeology of Thailand
379
Contributors
401
Index
405

IsraelPalestine
245
The PoliticsArchaeology Connection at Work
247

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Philip Kohl is professor of anthropology and the Davis Professor of Slavic Studies at Wellesley College. Mara Kozelsky is assistant professor of history at the University of South Alabama. Nachman Ben-Yehuda is professor of sociology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Bibliographic information