Suicide

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Simon and Schuster, May 11, 2010 - Social Science - 416 pages
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A classic book about the phenomenon of suicide and its social causes written by one of the world’s most influential sociologists.

Emile Durkheim’s Suicide addresses the phenomenon of suicide and its social causes. Written by one of the world’s most influential sociologists, this classic argues that suicide primarily results from a lack of integration of the individual into society. Suicide provides readers with an understanding of the impetus for suicide and its psychological impact on the victim, family, and society.
 

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important book for study of sociology

Contents

Editors Introduction
13
Preface
32
Introduction
41
3
47
How to Determine Social Causes and Social Types
145
Egoistic Suicide
152
Egoistic Suicide continued
171
Altruistic Suicide
217
Anomic Suicide
241
Individual Forms of the Different Types of Suicide
277
The Social Element of Suicide
297
Detailed Table of Contents
399
361
405
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Page 45 - We may then say conclusively: the term suicide is applied to all cases of death resulting directly or indirectly from a positive or negative act of the victim himself, which he knows will produce this result.
Page 42 - So, if we follow common use, we risk distinguishing what should be combined, or combining what should be distinguished, thus mistaking the real affinities of things, and accordingly misapprehending their nature. Only comparison affords explanation. A scientific investigation can thus be achieved only if it deals with comparable facts, and it is the more likely to succeed the more certainly it has combined all those that can be usefully compared.
Page 38 - I ties external to the individual. There is no principle for which we have received more criticism; but none is more fundamental. Indubitably for sociology to be possible, it must above all have an object all its own. It must take cognizance of a reality which is not in the domain of other sciences.

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About the author (2010)

Emile Durkheim (1858–1917) was a French sociologist who formally established the academic discipline and, with Karl Marx and Max Weber, is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science.

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