Using Qualitative Methods in Psychology

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SAGE Publications, Apr 20, 1999 - Medical - 237 pages
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The authors analyze the observational methods which historically form the basis of the field of psychology. They go on to address topics such as: validity and reliability, training issues, ethics, and use of qualitative computer programmes. In the second part, issues related to the application of qualitative methods are considered, for example HIV//AIDS, feminist perspectives, vocational, and adolescent development.

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About the author (1999)

Mary Kopala (Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University) is an associate professor in Educational Foundations and Counseling, Division of Education, at Hunter College, CUNY. In addition to her book with Merle Keitel, Counseling Women with Breast Cancer: A Guide for Professionals (Sage, 7/00), she is editor of Using Qualitative Methods in Psychology (Sage, 1999) and numerous journal articles and book chapters. She is also a licensed psychologist in private practice.

Lisa Suzuki conducts research in the area of multicultural assessment in particular understanding how culture impacts the process of cognitive assessment. Her work also focuses on the usage of qualitative research strategies with diverse ethnocultural groups. She serves as an Associate Editor of The Counseling Psychologist, Consulting Editor of The Journal of Psychological Assessment, and Consulting Editor of The Asian Journal of Counseling. She is senior co-editor of the Handbook of Multicultural Assessment now in its third edition (with Joseph Ponterotto) and co editor of The Handbook of Multicultural Counseling (with Joseph Ponterotto, Manuel Casas, and Charlene Alexander) also in its third edition. She is co-author of Intelligent Testing with Minority Students (with Richard Valencia) and co-editor of Using Qualitative Methods in Psychology (with Mary Kopala). Suzuki currently co-editing a text (with Donna Nagata and Laura Kohn-Wood) entitled Qualitative Strategies with Ethnocultural Populations to be published by APA Books. She is currently working with Jacqueline Mattis and a group of doctoral students on a study focusing on meaning making among survivors of the Holocaust in collaboration with Elizabeth Edelstein of the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City. Suzuki is the recipient of the Distinguished Contribution bestowed by the Asian American Psychological Association (2006) and the Visionary Leadership Award from the National Multicultural Conference and Summit (2007). Suzuki served as the Vice-President of Diversity and Public Interest for the Society of Counseling Psychology (Division 17) of the American Psychological Association (2002-2005). Suzuki received her doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1992 and has taught in the counseling psychology programs at Fordham University and the University of Oregon.

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