Roman Manliness: "Virtus" and the Roman Republic

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 3, 2006 - History - 481 pages
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This book examines the public and the most important aspect of Roman masculinity: Manliness as represented by the concept of virtus. Using traditional historical, philological, and archaeological analyses, together with the methods of socio-linguistics and gender studies, it presents a comprehensive picture of how Roman manliness developed from the middle to the late Republic. Arguing that virtus was not, in essence, a moral concept, Myles McDonnell shows how the semantic range of the word, together with the manly ideal that it embodied, were altered by Greek cultural ideas; and how Roman manliness was contested in the religion, culture, and politics of the late Republic.
 

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Contents

I
391
II
12
III
16
IV
33
V
44
VI
50
VII
59
VIII
72
XXVIII
206
XXIX
209
XXX
212
XXXI
228
XXXII
235
XXXIII
241
XXXIV
242
XXXV
248

IX
84
X
95
XI
105
XII
107
XIII
110
XIV
128
XV
134
XVI
142
XVII
146
XVIII
149
XIX
154
XX
159
XXI
161
XXII
165
XXIII
168
XXIV
173
XXV
181
XXVI
185
XXVII
195
XXXVI
259
XXXVII
265
XXXVIII
267
XXXIX
271
XL
290
XLI
293
XLII
295
XLIII
300
XLIV
320
XLV
332
XLVI
356
XLVII
385
XLVIII
391
XLIX
433
L
467
LI
xi
LII
xiii
LIII
xvii
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