Library of Amateur Photography, Volume 4

Front Cover
American school of art and photography, 1911 - Photography
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Contents

I
19
II
35
III
39
IV
51
V
59
VI
63
VII
75
VIII
77
XXVII
209
XXVIII
213
XXIX
221
XXX
237
XXXI
243
XXXII
249
XXXIII
255
XXXIV
265

IX
81
X
87
XI
91
XII
95
XIII
101
XIV
115
XV
121
XVI
127
XVII
131
XVIII
139
XIX
147
XX
151
XXI
167
XXII
173
XXIII
179
XXIV
187
XXV
193
XXVI
199
XXXV
271
XXXVI
297
XXXVII
303
XXXVIII
307
XXXIX
313
XL
319
XLI
327
XLII
343
XLIII
353
XLIV
361
XLV
365
XLVI
375
XLVII
387
XLVIII
393
XLIX
397
L
403
LI
415
Copyright

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Page 79 - There would be no particular points of light on the subject that would stand out more clearly than others. Of course, light draperies and light portions of the subject will reproduce light, and dark parts will be dark in the photograph, but there would not be any perceptible amount of relief, or roundness, shown in the finished print.
Page 80 - If the subject is placed on the shadow side of the house, the house itself acts as a curtain — shutting off the light from one side. Still, a flood of light will come from the top, so it is necessary to go a little farther and, perhaps, place the subject under a porch. Now two sides are screened from the flood of light, and if a background is placed at one end of the porch it would be possible to obtain a fairly pleasing portrait.
Page 80 - Effect of All Side Light.— If the subject is placed in a room, quite near a window, with opaque shades pulled down from the top until the light comes in only at the lower half, all shadows will be cast straight across the face ; the side next to the light will be in very strong light, while the opposite side will be in heavy shadow.
Page 83 - This is accomplished by placing a piece of thin cloth — such as cheese-cloth or muslin — over the window, softening the light; not only reducing the harshness of the high-lights, but diffusing the light throughout the room so that the shadows receive better illumination. This, then, reduces the amount of contrast and gives a softness which is unobtainable if the hard direct light is allowed to fall on the subject.
Page 79 - Light.— True, characteristic and pleasing effects may be produced out-ofdoors, but it is necessary that some methods or means of controlling the immense expanse of light be employed. For instance, it is almost impossible to place the subject in strong sunlight and expect to get a pleasing effect.
Page 83 - Even though the light may fall at the proper angle, there may still be deep shadows on the side of the face farthest from the light. The parts of the face receiving the strongest volume of light may be too white, so it is necessary that the light be further controlled. This is accomplished by placing a piece of thin cloth — such as...
Page 30 - ... attention to technical detail is necessary in architectural work than in landscape. Nine out of ten prints of architectural interiors are spoilt by insufficient foreground being shown. A fairly low point of view is generally the best, as it prevents the appearance of the floor running uphill. An immense difference may be made in the lighting of most interiors by choosing the right time of day.
Page 79 - Why is it impossible to photograph a subject, with proper portrait effects, out in the open in broad daylight? Why is it imperative that any particular form of lighting or a special method of arrangement of light is necessary? Why is it impractical to place a subject next to a window, make an exposure and secure good results?
Page 83 - From the foregoing it will be understood to be absolutely necessary that some method, or means, be adopted for controlling the light and enabling the production of any desired effect, although it is not necessary to have expensive paraphernalia.
Page 77 - Modifications in Lighting. — No matter how carefully the lighting may have been made, some modifications of heavy shadows are at times necessary; otherwise the printed image would be exaggerated in one way or another, CHAPTER IX.

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