The Tour of Doctor Syntax: In Search of the Picturesque, a Poem

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Bell, 1865 - English poetry - 313 pages
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Contents

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3
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III
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IV
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VII
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VIII
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XV
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Page 125 - Your sport, my Lord, I cannot take, For I must go and hunt a Lake ; And while you chase the flying deer, I must fly off to Windermere. 'Stead of hallooing to a fox, I must catch echoes from the rocks ; With curious eye and active scent, I on the picturesque am bent ; This is my game, I must pursue it, And make it where I cannot view it : Though in good truth, but do not flout me, I bear that self-same thing about me.
Page 17 - I'll employ my pencil too: — I'll ride and write, and sketch and print, And thus create a real mint; I'll prose it here, I'll verse it there, And picturesque it ev'ry where: I'll do what all have done before; I think I shall — and somewhat more. At Doctor Pompous give a look; He made his fortune by a book; And if my volume does not beat it, When I return, I'll fry and eat it.
Page 23 - I've a right — (who dares deny it?) To place yon group of asses by it. Aye! this will do: and now I'm thinking, That self-same pond where Grizzle's drinking, If hither brought 'twould better seem, And faith I'll turn it to a stream: I'll make this flat a shaggy ridge, And o'er the water throw a bridge: I'll do as other sketchers do — Put any thing into the view; And any object recollect, To add a grace, and give effect.
Page 80 - ALONG the varying road of Life, In calm content, in toil or strife ; At morn or noon, by night or day, As time conducts him on his way, How oft doth man, by care oppress'd, Find in an Inn a place of rest...
Page 37 - That's most true, And now I'm to be robb'd by you.' Hostess 'Sir, you mistake; and did not I Disdain rude words, I'd say — you lie. I took you in last night, I say.' Syntax "Tis true; — and if this bill I pay You'll take me in again, to-day.
Page 18 - At length the ling'ring moment came That gave the dawn of wealth and fame. Incurious Ralph, exact at four, Led Grizzle, saddled, to the door ; And soon, with more than common state, The Doctor stood before the gate. Behind him was his faithful wife ; — " One more embrace, my dearest life ! " Then his grey palfrey he bestrode, And gave a nod, and off he rode.
Page 303 - That toil would cease, that things would mend I did to my allotment bow, And smok'd my pipe as I do now. Hail, social tube ! thou foe to Care ! Companion of my easy chair ! Form'd not, with cold and Stoic art, To harden, but to soothe the heart ! For Bacon, a much wiser man Than any of the Stoic clan, Declares thy power to control Each fretful impulse of the soul ; And Swift has said (a splendid name On the large sphere of mortal fame). That he who daily smokes two pipes The tooth-ache never has...
Page 126 - If in man's form you wish to see The picturesque — pray look at me. I am myself, without a flaw, The very picturesque I draw ; A Rector, on whose face so sleek In vain you for a wrinkle seek ; In whose fair form, so fat and round, No obtuse angle's to be found. On such a shape no man of taste Would his fine tints or canvas waste : But take a curate, who's so thin, His bones seem peeping thro...
Page 55 - A wicked bull no sooner view'd him, Than loud he roar'd, and straight pursu'd him. The Doctor finding danger near, Flew swiftly on the wings of fear, And nimbly clamber'd up a tree, That gave him full security ; But as he ran to save his bacon, By hat and wig he was forsaken ; His sketch-book too, he left behind, A prey to the unlucky wind : While Grizzle, startled by the rout, Broke from the hedge, and pranc'd about.
Page 81 - Dodsley's collection the stanza ran thus : — ' Whoe'er has travelled life's dull round, Whate'er his -various tour has been, May sigh to think how oft he found His warmest welcome at an inn.

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