Maximizing Intelligence

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers - Psychology - 239 pages
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The "nature versus nurture" controversy dates back to at least the nineteenth century. How much of a role does genetics or environment play in accounting for reasoning skill and other intellectual aptitudes? Maximizing Intelligence, now in paperback, convincingly argues that both environment and genetics play a role in a child's intelligence, but family environment, especially at an early age, is of primary importance--and suggests how intelligence may be heightened.

 

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Contents

Maximizing Intelligence
1
Four Propositions about Intelligence
2
The Ten Most Important Risk Factors
6
The Basis for the Book
8
Organization of the Book
10
The Nature and Importance of Intelligence
13
The Nature and Malleability of Intelligence
22
The Timing of IQ Changes
37
Racial Differences in IQ and Achievement
103
Racial Differences in Risk Factors
110
Racial Differences in Schooling
119
Reducing the IQ Gap
128
Agents of Change for Intelligence
135
Schools and Preschools
136
Families and Early Intervention Strategies
162
Summary
177

Why IQ is Important
43
The Risk Factors for Intelligence
51
The Role of Parent IQ
53
The Sequence of Risk Factors
56
Risk Factors after Birth or Conception
57
Environmental Risk Factors before Birth
70
Summary of the Risk Factors for Intelligence
92
Race Family and Intelligence
101
The Outlook for Maximizing Intelligence
181
Maximizing Whose Intelligence?
189
Policy Approaches for Maximizing Intelligence
190
Multivariate Analysis of the Risk Factors
197
Analysis of Risk Factors for African American Children
203
Regression Analysis of 1996 NAEP Data
207
Index
211
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