Friends' Miscellany, Volume 9

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Printed for the editors by J. Richards, 1837 - Quakers
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Page 85 - Behold, I have refined thee, but not with silver ; I have chosen thee in the furnace of affliction.
Page 6 - These things I did not see by the help of man, nor by the letter, though they are written in the letter ; but I saw them in the light of the Lord Jesus Christ, and by his immediate Spirit and power, as did the holy men of God, by whom the Scriptures were written.
Page 230 - ... which hath no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it, for the glory of God doth enlighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof.
Page 65 - He raiseth up the poor out of the dust, and lifteth up the beggar from the dunghill, to set them among princes, and to make them inherit the throne of glory : for the pillars of the earth are the Lord's, and he hath set the world upon them.
Page 6 - And I was to bring people off from all the world's religions, which are vain; that they might know the pure religion...
Page 7 - Thou all men and women, without any respect to rich or poor, great or small. And as I travelled up and down, I was not to bid people Good morrow or Good evening; neither might I bow or scrape -with my leg to any one; and this made the sects and professions to rage.
Page 63 - Shall we receive good at the hand of the Lord, and shall we not receive evil?
Page 181 - born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the Word of God, which liveth and abideth forever.
Page 9 - In fairs also, and in markets, I was made to declare against their deceitful merchandize, cheating, and cozening; warning all to deal justly, to speak the truth, to let their yea be yea, and their nay be nay, and to do unto others as they would have others do unto them; forewarning them of the great and terrible day of the Lord, which would come upon them all.
Page 48 - Among the natural rights, some are in their very nature unalienable, because no equivalent can be given or received for them. Of this kind are the rights of conscience.

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