The Clan Donald, Volume 2

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Northern Counties Publishing Company, Limited, 1900
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It is wonderful to have access to this classic history of Clan Donald. A & A Macdonald compiled a full account of Clan Donald from Gaelic poetry and legends dating back to 1411.
Larry C. McDonald

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Page 453 - Vainly sped the withering volley 'Mongst the foremost of our band — On we poured until we met them. Foot to foot, and hand to hand. Horse and man went down like drift-wood When the floods are black at Yule, And their carcasses are whirling In the Garry's deepest pool. Horse and man went down before us — Living foe there tarried none On the field of Killiecrankie, When that stubborn fight was done...
Page 213 - ... and then it is added, if Mackean of Glenco, and that tribe, can be well separated from the rest, it will be a proper vindication of the public justice to extirpate that sect of thieves...
Page 210 - Your troops will destroy entirely the country of Lochaber, Lochiel's lands, Keppoch's, Glengarry's and Glencoe's. Your power shall be large enough. I hope the soldiers will not trouble the government with prisoners.''!
Page 486 - He seems to have lived a century too late, and to exist, in a state of complete law and order, like a Glengarry of old, whose will was law to his sept. Warmhearted, generous, friendly, he is beloved by those who know him, and his efforts are unceasing to show kindness to those of his clan who are disposed fully to admit his pretensions.
Page 213 - That the rebels may not think themselves desperate, we allow you to give terms and quarters, but in this manner only, that chieftains and heritors, or leaders, be prisoners of war, their lives only safe, and all other things in mercy, they taking the oath of allegiance; and the community taking the oath of allegiance and rendering their arms, and submitting to the government, are to have quarters and indemnity for their lives and fortunes, and to be protected from the soldiers...
Page 223 - Glenco men, they declared that, if that was the case, they must return home. If they were considered so dishonourable as to take revenge on an innocent man, they were not fit to remain with honourable men, nor to support an honourable cause ; and it was not without much explanation, and great persuasion, that they were prevented from marching away the following morning.
Page 764 - ... spectare valentibus quomodolibet in futurum libere quiete plenarie integre honorifice bene et in pace Sine...
Page 497 - ... of his father's estate, and that he should seize upon all that was beyond the point of Ardnamurchan southward. The Abbot being a subtle eloquent man, brought over to his side the chief of the Macleans and Macleod of Harris, to get the islands for themselves from the Lord of the Isles, who, hearing of the insolence of the new faction, raised some powerful forces, viz., the men of Ross, Macleod of Lewis, his own brother Alister Carrick, Macintosh, Mackenzie, the chief of the Camerons, the Islanders,...
Page 664 - ... entitle them to the good graces of their injured sovereign. But in spite of all the lenity and clemency that a prince could show or promise, the Campbells have openly appeared with their wonted zeal for rebellion and usurpation, in a most officious manner. Nor could we...
Page 213 - ... to give terms and quarters, but in this manner only, that chieftains and heritors, or leaders, be prisoners of war, their lives only safe, and all other things in mercy, they taking the oath of allegiance ; and the community taking the oath of allegiance, and rendering their arms, and submitting to the government, are to have quarters and indemnity for their lives and fortunes, and to be protected from the soldiers, as their principal paper of instructions produced by Sir Thomas Levingston bears.

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