The Novels of Jane Austen: Persuasion

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J. M. Dent, 1892
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Contents

I
3
II
11
III
18
IV
26
V
32
VI
43
VII
54
VIII
65
XIII
132
XIV
140
XV
148
XVI
156
XVII
167
XVIII
180
XIX
187
XX
198

IX
75
X
84
XI
96
XII
123
XXI
220
XXII
236
XXIII
258

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Page 31 - How eloquent could Anne Elliot have been,— how eloquent, at least, were her wishes on the side of early warm attachment, and a cheerful confidence in futurity, against that over-anxious caution which seems to insult exertion and distrust Providence! — She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older— the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.
Page 3 - SIR WALTER ELLIOT, of Kellynch Hall, in Somersetshire, was a man who, for his own amusement, never took up any book but the Baronetage; there he found occupation for an idle hour, and consolation in a distressed one...
Page 116 - By this time the report of the accident had spread among the workmen and boatmen about the Cobb, and many were collected near them, to be useful if wanted; at any rate, to enjoy the sight of a dead young lady, — nay, two dead young ladies, for it proved twice as fine as the first report.
Page 166 - Mr. Elliot was rational, discreet, polished, — but he was not open. There was never any burst of feeling, any warmth of indignation or delight, at the evil or good of others.
Page 88 - ... the ploughs at work, and the fresh-made path, spoke the farmer counteracting the sweets of poetical despondence, and meaning to have spring again...
Page 242 - We certainly do not forget you so soon as you forget us. It is, perhaps, our fate rather than our merit. We cannot help ourselves. We live at home, quiet, confined, and our feelings prey upon us.
Page 30 - ... past undone, she began now to have the anxiety which borders on hopelessness for Anne's being tempted, by some man of talents and independence, to enter a state for which she held her to be peculiarly fitted by her warm affections and domestic habits. They knew not each other's opinion, either its constancy or its change, on the one leading point of Anne's conduct, for the subject was never alluded to; but Anne, at seven-and-twenty, thought very differently from what she had been made to think...
Page 70 - Personal size and mental sorrow have certainly no necessary proportions. A large bulky figure has as good a right to be in deep affliction as the most graceful set of limbs in the world. But, fair or not fair, there are unbecoming conjunctions, which reason will patronize in vain — which taste cannot tolerate — which ridicule will seize.
Page 4 - Vanity was the beginning and end of Sir Walter Elliot's character; vanity of person and of situation. He had been remarkably handsome in his youth; and, at fifiyfour, was still a very fine man. Few women could think more of their personal appearance than he did; nor could the valet of any new made lord be more delighted with the place he held in society.
Page 62 - Wentworth's, a bow, a curtsey passed; she heard his voice; he talked to Mary, said all that was right, said something to the Miss Musgroves, enough to mark an easy footing; the room seemed full, full of persons and voices, but a few minutes ended it.

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