America's story for America's children, Volume 3

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D.C. Heath & Company, 1901 - History - 38 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 Excerpt: ...houses were built of wood, except the gable ends; and these were of yellow Dutch bricks. The houses had many large doors and many small windows; and the year in which the house was built was always put upon the front of it in large iron figures. "In these simple days house-cleaning was the test of a good housewife. The front door was ornamented with a huge brass knocker--sometimes in the shape of a dog, or a tiger, or a lion, and this was scrubbed every day till often it was fairly worn out with the scrubbing. "The whole house was always being mopped and swept and cleaned; for the Dutch housewife delighted in water. "The grand parlor was the sacred place of all. In this room no one but the housewife and her maid were allowed to enter. These two visited it once a week, but only to clean it. They scrubbed the floor and then sprinkled it with fine white sand. Then they placed new branches of evergreen in the fireplace. Then when they had polished the windows and the furniture, they closed the room, locked the door, and left it till the next week. Then they came and cleaned it again. "The fireplace in the Dutch living-room was large and generous. The whole family could sit around it. Even the cats and dogs had their corners in the fireplace; and there was room for all. "Here the old burgher would sit and smoke and look into the fireplace, and wink and blink and sleep. Here the goode vrow would spin and knit. And here the young people would crowd about to Dutch Pleasure Wagon Of The Olden Time. listen to the stories the good old negro slaves would croak forth the whole long winter afternoon. "In this colony all well-trained people rose with the sun and went to bed with the sun. They dined at eleven and had tea parties at three. Thes...
 

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