Profits, Power, and Prohibition: American Alcohol Reform and the Industrializing of America, 1800-1930

Front Cover
SUNY Press, 1989 - Political Science - 272 pages
0 Reviews
This is the first comprehensive study of America's anti-liquor/anti-drug movement from its origins in the late eighteenth century through the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment in 1933. It examines the role that capitalism played in defining and shaping this reform movement.

Rumbarger challenges conventional explanations of the history of this movement and offers compelling counter-arguments to explain the movement's historical development. He successfully links the ethics of business enterprise and those of moral reform of society for the betterment of enterprise.

The author reveals how readily economic power is transformed--first into social power and finally into political power in the context of a bourgeois democracy. He shows that the motivation driving this reform movement was not religiosity, but profit, and that anti-liquor capitalists viewed the "human equation" as determinant of America's prospect for creating wealth.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Social and Ideological Origins of Drink Reform
3
Social Class
21
Reorganization of the Temperance
42
Temperance Confronts
57
Liquor Control
69
Part III
81
Antisaloonism and Urban Reform 18901915 709
109
Antisaloonism and Industrial Development 18901915
123
Part IV
153
Drink Reform and the American Experience
184
Notes
199
Sources
259
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1989)

John J. Rumbarger, former assistant executive secretary of the American Historical Association and editor of Prologue: Journal of the National Archives, lives and works in Washington, D.C.

Bibliographic information