Horace Between Freedom and Slavery: The First Book of <i>Epistles</i>

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University of Wisconsin Pres, Dec 8, 2015 - History - 384 pages
During the Roman transition from Republic to Empire in the first century B.C.E., the poet Horace found his own public success in the era of Emperor Augustus at odds with his desire for greater independence. In Horace between Freedom and Slavery, Stephanie McCarter offers new insights into Horace's complex presentation of freedom in the first book of his Epistles and connects it to his most enduring and celebrated moral exhortation, the golden mean.

She argues that, although Horace commences the Epistles with an uncompromising insistence on freedom, he ultimately adopts a middle course. She shows how Horace explores in the poems the application of moderate freedom first to philosophy, then to friendship, poetry, and place. Rather than rejecting philosophical masters, Horace draws freely on them without swearing permanent allegiance to any—a model for compromise that allows him to enjoy poetic

renown and friendships with the city's elite while maintaining a private sphere of freedom. This moderation and adaptability, McCarter contends, become the chief ethical lessons that Horace learns for himself and teaches to others. She reads Horace's reconfiguration of freedom as a political response to the transformations of the new imperial age.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Epistles 11
25
Inconsistency and Sickness in Epistles 11 18 and 115
43
Poetry and Philosophy in Epistles 11 and 12
67
The Moral Adviser of Epistles 14 15 16 and 112
93
Horace Maecenas and the Sabine Farm in Epistles 17 and 116
124
Epistles 110 111 and 114
161
Epistles 117 and 118
190
Epistles 13 and 119
226
Freedom and Publication in Epistles 113 and 120
256
Notes
275
Bibliography
333
Index
349
Index Locorum
355
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About the author (2015)

Stephanie McCarter is an associate professor of classical languages at Sewanee: The University of the South.

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