Holding Aloft the Banner of Ethiopia: Caribbean Radicalism in Early Twentieth-century America

Front Cover
Verso, 1998 - History - 406 pages
0 Reviews
A major history of the impact of Caribbean migration to the United States. Marcus Garvey, Claude McKay, Claudia Jones, C.L.R. James, Stokely Carmichael, Louis Farakhan -- the roster of immigrants from the Caribbean who have made a profound impact on the development of radical politics in the United States is extensive. In this magisterial and lavishly illustrated work, Winston James focuses on the twentieth century's first waves of immigrants from the Caribbean and their contribution to political dissidence in America. Examining the way in which the characteristics of the societies they left shaped their perceptions of the land to which they traveled, Winston James draws sharp differences between Hispanic and English-speaking arrivals. He explores the interconnections between the Cuban independence struggle, Puerto Rican nationalism, Afro-American feminism, and black communism in the first turbulent decades of the twentieth century. He also provides fascinating insights into the impact of Puerto Rican radicalism in New York City and recounts the remarkable story of Afro-Cuban radicalism in Florida.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Characteristics and Forces
50
Race and Caribbean Reactions to America
92
Dimensions and Main Currents of Caribbean Radicalism
122
Race Consciousness Class Consciousness and the Political
185
The Strange Case
232
EPILOGUE
258
NOTES
292
STATISTICAL APPENDIX
353
BIBLIOGRAPHY
372
INDEX
399
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

Winston James is Professor of History at University of California Irvine.

Bibliographic information