Habit and intelligence in their connexion with the laws of matter and force, Volume 1

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Macmillan and Company, 1869 - Biology
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Contents

I
1
II
16
III
25
IV
32
V
39
VII
47
VIII
55
IX
68
XVI
154
XVIII
167
XIX
187
XX
205
XXI
219
XXII
228
XXIII
241
XXIV
252

X
84
XI
90
XII
110
XIII
125
XIV
132
XV
145
XXV
278
XXVI
292
XXVII
308
XXVIII
328
XXIX
342

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Page 262 - In my possession are two little embryos in spirit, whose names I have omitted to attach, and at present I am quite unable to say to what class they belong. They may be lizards or small birds, or very young mammalia, so complete is the similarity in the mode of formation of the head and trunk in these animals. The extremities, however, are still absent in these embryos. But, even if they had existed in the earliest stage of their development, we should learn nothing, for the feet of lizards and mammals,...
Page 315 - ... been useful to its possessor. Nor can I see any insuperable difficulty in further believing it possible that the membrane-connected fingers and fore-arm of the Galeopithecus might be greatly lengthened by natural selection ; and this, as far as the organs of flight are concerned, would convert it into a bat.
Page 313 - It is free intercrossing which chiefly gives uniformity, both under nature and under domestication, to the individuals of the same species or variety, when they live mingled together and are not exposed to any cause inducing excessive variability. The prevention of free crossing, and the intentional matching of individual animals, are the corner-stones of the breeder's art.
Page 171 - ... inches. It was found that the greyhounds could not support the fatigues of a long chase in this attenuated atmosphere, and before they could come up with their prey, they lay down gasping for breath ; but these same animals have produced whelps which have grown up, and are not in the least degree incommoded by the want of density in the air, but run down the hares with as much ease as the fleetest of their race in this country.
Page 197 - The most remarkable case is that observed by Dr. Godron, of Nancy. In 1861 that botanist observed, amongst a sowing of Datura tatula, the fruits of which are very spinous, a single individual of which the capsule was perfectly smooth. The seeds taken from this plant all furnished plants having the character of this individual. The fifth and sixth generations are now growing without exhibiting the least tendency to revert to the spinous form. More remarkable still, when crossed with the normal Datura...
Page 103 - ... movement termed rotation or gyration, which is often seen in the contents of young " cells," and which, in some form or other, are probably of general occurrence, may depend on the contractility of protoplasm. They are said by those who have studied them to present a close resemblance to those of Amoeba and its allies. No one has yet shown a distinction of importance between protoplasm of the vegetable and sarcode of the animal kingdom. But there are other movements in plants, the cause of which...
Page 319 - The higher the organization, whether of an entire organism or of a single organ, the greater is the number of the parts that co-operate, and the more perfect is their cooperation; and consequently the more necessity there is for corresponding variations to take place in all the cooperating parts at once, and the more useless will be any variation whatever unless it is accompanied by corresponding...
Page 349 - the existing state of things on the earth, life on the earth, all geological history showing continuity of life, must be limited within some such period of past time as 100,000,000 years.
Page 349 - And when finally we consider underground temperature we find ourselves driven to the conclusion that the existing state of things on the earth, life on the earth, and all geological history showing continuity of life, must be limited within some such period of past time as one hundred million years.

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