American Diplomatic Questions

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Macmillan, 1901 - Bering Sea controversy - 529 pages
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Page 427 - To-day the United States is practically sovereign on this continent, and its fiat is law upon the subjects to which it confines its interposition.
Page 333 - At the proposal of the Russian Imperial Government, made through the Minister of the Emperor residing here, a full power and instructions have been transmitted to the Minister of the United States at St. Petersburg, to arrange, by amicable negotiation, the respective rights and interests of the two nations on the north-west coast of this Continent.
Page 333 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Page 442 - When such report is made and accepted it will, in my opinion, be the duty of the United States to resist by every means in its power as a wilful aggression upon its rights and interests the appropriation by Great Britain of any lands or the exercise of governmental jurisdiction over any territory which after investigation we have determined of right belongs to Venezuela.
Page 32 - Pacific Ocean," as used in the treaty of 1825 between Great Britain and Russia ; and what rights, if any, in the Bering's Sea were held and exclusively exercised by Russia after said treaty ? 4.
Page 322 - ... should be, never to entangle ourselves in the broils of Europe. Our second, never to suffer Europe to intermeddle with cis-Atlantic affairs. America, North and South, has a set of interests distinct from those of Europe, and peculiarly her own. She should, therefore, have a system of her own, separate and apart from that of Europe. While the last is laboring to become the domicile of despotism, our endeavor should surely be to make our hemisphere that of freedom.
Page 335 - Governments and Spain we declared our neutrality at the time of their recognition, and to this we have adhered, and shall continue to adhere, provided no change shall occur which, in the judgment of the competent authorities of this Government, shall make a corresponding change on the part of the United States indispensable to their security.
Page 509 - States fishermen by the Convention between the United States and Great Britain, signed at London on the 20th day of October, 1818, of taking, curing, and drying fish on certain coasts, of the British North American Colonies therein defined, the inhabitants of the United States shall have, in common with the subjects of Her Britannic Majesty, the liberty...
Page 334 - It was stated at the commencement of the last session that a great effort was then making in Spain and Portugal to improve the condition of the people of those countries, and that it appeared to be conducted with extraordinary moderation. It need scarcely be remarked that the result has been so far very different from what was then...
Page 283 - Plenipotentiary : who, after having communicated each to the other their respective full powers which were found to be in proper form, have agreed upon and concluded the following articles : ARTICLE I. The General Act concluded and signed by the aforesaid Powers at Berlin on the 14th day of June, AD 1889, and all previous treaties, conventions and agreements relating to

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