The Elements of Morality: Including Polity, Volume 1

Front Cover
Harper & bros., 1847 - Ethics
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Contents

Memory and Imagination 37 Good Hope and Fear 38 Separation of Mental Desires Instincts 39 The Desire of Safety
42
Instinct of Selfpreservation
43
Desire of Security 42 Desire of Liberty 43 Men at Enmity 44 The Desire of Having
44
Things and Persons
45
Property is necessary
46
The Desire of Family Society 48 The Desire of Civil Society
47
Mental Desires include Affections
49
The Need of a Mutual Understanding 51 Promises are necessary
50
The Desire of Superiority 53 Desire of Equal Rules 54 The Desire of Knowledge
52
Knowledge and Reason
55
The Moral Sentiments 56 Approbation and Disapprobation 5 The Reflex Sentiments
56
Reflex Thought
57
The Desire of being loved
58
The Desire of Esteem
59
The Desire of our own Approval
60
Rules necessary for the Peace of Society 66 Rules necessary for the Action of Man as Man 67 Reason our necessary guide 68 Rules not founded in ...
61
Right Adjective and Right Substantive
62
Right relatively used 71 Refers to a superior
71
Right absolutely used
72
The Supreme Good
73
Ought Duty
74
Why Ought
76
Man a Moral Being
77
Rights must exist
78
Rights separately proved
79
Five Primary kinds of Rights
80
Wrong Injury
81
Rights are Realities
82
Punishment
83
Rights and right
84
Obligation
85
Obligation and Duty
86
Obliged and Ought
87
Obligation and Moral Claim
88
Perfect and Imperfect Obligation
89
Jus the Doctrine of Rights and Obligations
90
Duties Virtues Goodness Vice
91
Virtuous and vicious internal acts
92
Sins 94 The State
93
Immutable Morality and Mutable Law 76
99
Ryots Serfs Metayers Farmers 136 Feudal System
103
Its present influence 138 Quiritarian Ownership 139 Title Conveyance Remedies
105
Law and Morality 106 Law seeks to be just
106
Roman and English
107
Five Classes of Primary Righto
108
Rights imperfectly held
109
Property and Contract distinct
110
Private and Public Wrongs
111
vol lB
112
Trusts 153 Alienation 154 Succession
113
Delivery
114
The Rights of the Person 89 Art 112 Wrongs against the Person Homicide
115
Dangerous Games
116
Selfdefence
117
Manslaughter
118
Murder
119
Justifiable Homicide
120
Nocturnal Thief
121
Provocation
122
Accessories
123
Duels
124
Punishment
125
Riot c 127 Chastisement
126
The Family
127
Classes of Men with imperfect Rights
128
The Rights op Property 99
136
Law is a means of Moral Education
153
Money
159
Of the Idea of Moral Goodness
161
Repairs and Expenses 168 Debt
167
Promissory Notes and Bills of Exchange
169
Zeal Energy
176
Virtues of the Mental Desires
177
Virtues connected with Truth
178
Jewish Marriage
179
Greek Marriage
180
Roman Marriage
181
English Marriage
182
Husband and Wife
183
Adultery
184
Rights over Children Roman
185
English
186
Rape and Seduction Roman
187
English
188
Inheritance
189
Testament Roman
190
Limited
191
Will English
192
Entail
193
Legacies
194
Dowry Jointure
195
Tutor Curator 197 Guardian
196
The Sense of Duty
197
Lawful Marriage
198
Roman Forms of Marriage
199
English Forms of Marriage
200
Religious Ceremony of Marriage
201
The Judicial Function
211
Rebellion Treason
213
International
214
Government de Jure and de Facto
215
Legislative Body
216
Fact of Law and Idea of Justice to be brought to gether
217
Law and Justice cannot exist separately
218
Will
225
Duties connected with Purity
227
There is a Higher Part of our Nature 321 Special Duties of Purity
229
Duties of Order
235
Interruption of Moral Progress 355 Repentance
257
Amendment
258
Rules of Action 17 Means and Ends 18 Rules with Reasons 19 Chains of Rules 20 The Reason Practical
259
Not necessarily sufficient
264
Of Conscience
265
Duty is determined by social relations
278
Duty gives Moral Significance to Obligations
279
The Speculative and Practical Reason 22 Development of Mind
294
By unfolding conceptions of Virtues
295
By unfolding the notion of doing Good
296
Instincts 24 Springs of Action Motives
297
We have never done all that is possible
298
Classification of Duties
299
Our Moral Progress never terminates
300
It is our Duty to cultivate Gratitude
303
The greatest interruptions are the greatest trans gressions
304
The Duty of Moral Culture adds to other Duties
305
Moral Perfection is our greatest Good
306
Duties respecting Property and other Objects of Desires 217 Art 307 Desires to be directed by a Spirit of Justice 308 And by a Spirit of Moral Purpose
308
Duty of Moral Progress in such Spirit
309
For poor as well as rich
311
Power to be used for Moral Culture of others
312
Duties connected with Truth 222
314
This Duty regulated by Mutual Understanding
315
Bailment
316
but care is needed 441 Their consequences to be redressed 442 If they arise from Negligence are defects 443 But they may palliate actions 444 Ignor...
318
This Error may be removeable 455 Wilful Ignorance or Error
321
Progressive Standards of Morality
328
Duties and Spirit of Obedience 329 Duties depend on Customs in part
329
Duty of Obedience to the Laws
330
In many cases the Letter not the Spirit of
331
Duties of Command
332
Public Duties
333
Political Duties of Conservation and Progress
334
The State
335
Intellectual Duties 242
336
Not superseded by right Intention
337
The Duty of acting rationally
338
The Duty of acting according to Rule
339
Property in Land
340
Conceptions to be defined
341
The Duty of Intellectual Culture
342
Especially for Legislators
343
Equality Bona Fide
345
Of ourselves and others
346
Such progress is possible
347
Can never terminate
348
Transgression
349
Temptation
350
Resistance
351
Degrees of Guilt 853 Measure of Guilt
352
Conception of Natural Law among the Greeks
353
Stricti Juris Interpretation 175 Breach of Contract
355
What is Conscience? 360 Synteresis Syneidesis
360
Conscience the
361
Conscience the Witness 363 Conscience the Punisher
362
To act against Conscience is wrong
364
Is to act according to Conscience always right?
365
Conscience to be enlightened and instructed
366
Aid of Religion needed
367
Conscience not an Ultimate Authority
368
May be erroneous
369
Not valid as a Reason
370
Reverence due to Conscience
371
A good man is conscientious
372
Doubtful Conscience Good Conscience
373
Cases of Conscience respecting Truth Art 374 Cases of Conscience 375 Casuistry often suspected
375
Interpretation of Promises
377
Erroneous Promises
378
Promises released by the Promisee
379
but the Relative Duty is vio lated
380
Promises which become unlawful
382
Which Promisee does not think unlawful
383
Electors Promise 385 Promise to a Representative
385
Promise to be kept after the immoral action
386
Contradictory Promises 388 Impossible Promises
387
Extorted Promises
389
Promise to Robbers
390
Should the Promise be given?
391
Analogy of the
392
Lies
393
Falsehoods under Convention
394
Moral Education
395
To be carefully limited
396
Of Cases of Necessity 290
408

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Popular passages

Page 89 - And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page 127 - I come now, lastly, to speak of the legal consequences of such making, or dissolution. (By marriage the husband and wife are one person in law : that is, the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband : under whose wing, protection, and cover, she performs everything...
Page 90 - As when a man goeth into the wood with his neighbour to hew wood, and his hand fetcheth a stroke with the axe to cut down the tree, and the head slippeth from the helve, and lighteth upon his neighbour, that he die ; he shall flee unto one of those cities, and live...
Page 92 - If the sun be risen upon him, there shall be blood shed for him; for he should make full restitution: if he have nothing, then he shall be sold for his theft.
Page 128 - In the civil law the husband and the wife are considered as two distinct persons, and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries: and therefore in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and be sued without her husband.
Page 128 - The husband also, by the old law, might give his wife moderate correction. For, as he is to answer for her misbehaviour, the law thought it reasonable to intrust him with this power of restraining her, by domestic chastisement, in the same moderation that a man is allowed to correct his apprentices or children; for whom the master or parent is also liable in some cases to answer.
Page 139 - When these are shown, the marriage is declared null, as having been unlawful ab initio, and the parties are separated pro salute animarum, that they may not endanger their Souls by living in a state of known sin. But still the Ecclesiastical Law, like the Common Law of England, grants no Divorce for any Supervenient Cause ; according to Commentators*, it deems so highly, and with such mysterious reverence, the nuptial tie, that it will not allow it to be unloosed for any cause whatever that arises...
Page 115 - A good consideration is such as that of blood, or of natural love and affection, when a man grants an estate to a near relation: being founded on motives of generosity, prudence, and natural duty; a valuable consideration is such as money, marriage, or the like, which the law esteems an equivalent given for the grant:^ and is therefore founded in motives of justice.
Page 370 - A slave is one who is in the power of a master to whom he belongs. The master may sell him, dispose of his person, his industry and his labor. He can do nothing, possess nothing, nor acquire anything but what must belong to his master.
Page 121 - ... examination to be unsound, the purchaser must immediately return them to the vendor, or give him notice to take them back, and thereby rescind the contract, or he will be presumed to have acquiesced in the quality of the goods.

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