New elements of operative surgery, Volume 2

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Wood, 1856
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Page 494 - ... very far from it ; there are cases in which it is altogether inadmissible ; and I feel persuaded, that, whoever adheres to one mode only, will often find himself wofully disappointed in the result. The general rule of acting according to the features the case presents, is quite as applicable to these particular cases as to others generally. Preserving the patella, and not dividing its ligament, makes the operation more tedious and difficult ; but this is a very secondary consideration, where...
Page 88 - ... both these parts at the same time, and it is this visceral affection which immediately precedes dissolution. It is evident, then, that in many cases there is a period of time at which the amputation of the limb may be the means of preventing the establishment of a secondary disease. Nor is this all. Visceral disease, which was previously in a state of inactivity, may assume a new form, and begin to make a rapid progress, under the depressing influence of the disease of the joint ; and amputation,...
Page 385 - ... with moderate force to the superior part of the tumor, was sufficient to effect its separation. The. accessions of syncope prolonged the operation, which, however, did not last longer than three-quarters of an hour. Very little blood was lost; torsion and compression sufficed to arrest the hemorrhage. Two hours afterwards the edges of the wounds, from the angles of the eyes to the corners of the mouth, were united by twenty-six points of suture, and cold lotions were applied ; there was no reaction...
Page 495 - ... George , aet. 5 years, was first brought to the Dispensary of the Children's Hospital on April 27th, 1875, during the service of Dr. George S. Gerhard. Though residing in a malarious locality, and in a poor and filthily-kept house, he had always had good health up to one week previous to the above date, when he began to complain of pain in the region of the umbilicus. Under appropriate treatment he passed several lumbricoid worms, and the pain disappeared. A week later, however, it returned,...
Page 410 - ... as well as the first incision, arteries sprung in every direction, and required ligatures. A number of large branches of veins, under this muscle, emitted blood freely, and required to be tied. " In conducting the incision through the pectoral muscle, towards the scapular extremity of the clavicle, care was taken to avoid the cephalic vein, as it passes between this and the deltoid muscle.
Page 419 - The patient was a slim and delicate man, aged 40. ••A full dose of chloroform having been administered, an incision, sixteen inches in length, was made from the superior angle of the scapula to the inferior extremity of the tumor, its direction being obliquely downwards and inwards. Another, beginning about five inches below the upper end of the first, and terminating about the same distance from its lower end, was then carried, in a curvilinear direction, so as to include the small oval flap...
Page 496 - I performed the operation of excision of the joint on the 5th of May, 1853. Having found the disadvantages of the H-shaped incision in my first case, I now exposed the interior of the joint by a semilunar incision, extending from the inner side of the inner condyle of the femur to a corresponding point over the outer condyle, the incision passing in front of the joint nearly as low as the tuberosity of the tibia. The flap thus formed was dissected back, the ligamentum patella being divided, and the...
Page 522 - I have never, in the great number of broken heads I have had under my care on many different, and grand occasions, actually known the inner table to be separated from the outer, without positive marks of an injury having been inflicted on the bone or pericranium, however slight that injury may have been ; and although it is not possible to doubt the fact of fracture of the inner table having occurred...
Page 458 - Having dissected out both bones cawfully, and disarticulated them at the elbow, he removed them entire, with the exception of a portion of the lower end of the radius. A great portion of the periosteum was detached from the bones, and left in the wound. The usual treatment for such operations was then followed and the patient improved rapidly, and the wound had nearly healed, when several abscesses formed on the forearm. These abscesses were, according to Dr. C.'s opinion, produced by pieces of bones...
Page 411 - After cutting through the platysma myoides, this vein was carefully separated from the surrounding parts, and two tine ligatures passed beneath it, and tied a short distance from each other ; the vein was then cut between the ligatures. " The clavicular part of the sterno-cleido-mastoideus was next divided, about three inches above the clavicle, in the direction of this incision. . The deepseated fascia of the neck being now exposed, the mastoid muscle and the diseased mass were very cautiously separated...

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