Springfield, 1636-1886: History of Town and City : Including an Account of the Quarter-millennial Celebration at Springfield, Mass., May 25 and 26, 1886

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C.A. Nichols & Company, 1888 - Springfield (Mass.) - 645 pages
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Page 495 - GOD, GIVE US MEN! GOD, GIVE us MEN! A time like this demands Strong minds, great hearts, true faith and ready hands; Men whom the lust of office does not kill; Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy; Men who possess opinions and a will; Men who have honor; men who will not lie; Men who can stand before a demagogue And damn his treacherous flatteries without winking! Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the fog In public duty and in private thinking...
Page 495 - ... does not kill; Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy; Men who possess opinions and a will; Men who have Honor; men who will not lie; Men who can stand before a demagogue And Damn his treacherous flatteries without winking! Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the fog in public duty and in private thinking; For while the rabble, with their thumb-worn creeds, Their large professions and their little deeds, Mingle in selfish strife, Lo! freedom weeps, Wrong rules the land, and waiting justice...
Page 299 - You talk, my good Sir, of employing influence to appease the present tumults in Massachusetts. I know not where that influence is to be found, or, if attainable, that it would be a proper remedy for the disorders. Influence is not government. Let us have a government by which our lives, liberties, and properties will be secured, or let us know the worst at once.
Page 299 - Is it not time to awake from the deceitful dream of a golden age, and to adopt as a practical maxim for the direction of our political conduct, that we, as well as the other inhabitants of the globe, are yet remote from the happy empire of perfect wisdom and perfect virtue ? Let the point of extreme depression to which our national dignity and credit have sunk...
Page 299 - The tempestuous situation from which Massachusetts has scarcely emerged, evinces that dangers of this kind are not merely speculative. Who can determine what might have been the issue of her late convulsions, if the malcontents had been headed by a Caesar or by a Cromwell?
Page 299 - In regretting, which I have often done with the keenest sorrow, the death of our much lamented friend, General Greene, I have accompanied it of late with a query, whether he would not have preferred such an exit, to the scenes which, it is more than probable, many of his compatriots may live to bemoan.
Page 110 - WE received your letter bearing date the 15th of April, 1652, written in the behalf of Mr. William Pincheon, who is one that we did all love and respect. But his book and the doctrine therein contained we cannot but abhor as pernicious and dangerous ; and are much grieved, that such an erroneous pamphlet was penned by any New England man...
Page 9 - ... but a trusty man that neuer was a trader will quickly find the way of trading, & bring you best profitt.
Page 239 - Ruler of heaven and earth ; inexpressibly glorious in holiness, and worthy of all possible honor, confidence, and love; that in the unity of the Godhead there are three persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost ; equal in every divine perfection, and executing distinct but harmonious offices in the great work of redemption.
Page 110 - ... any one of our ministers in all the four jurisdictions that doth approve of the same, but all do judge it as erroneous and heretical. And to the end that we might give satisfaction to all the world of our just proceedings against him, and for the avoiding of any just offence to be taken against us, we caused Mr.

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