Atlanta University Publications, Issue 4

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Atlanta University Press, 1899 - African Americans
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Page 59 - Anglo-Saxon civilization— and by business I mean those efforts directly or indirectly concerned with a purposive tendency to material development and progress, with the point in view of the effort bringing material profit or advantage to the one making the effort; and I would include all such efforts whether made in peace or war. I was saying, business seems to be not only simply the raw material of AngloSaxon civilization, but almost the civilization itself. It is at least its mainspring to action....
Page 48 - ... organize and become the Principal of a Normal School, which the people wanted to start in that town. The letter to Gen. Armstrong was written on behalf of the colored people of the town of Tuskegee by Mr. Geo. W. Campbell, one of the foremost white citizens of Tuskegee. Mr. Campbell is still the president of the Board of Trustees of the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, and has from the first been one of its warmest and most steadfast friends. When Mr. Campbell wrote to Gen. Armstrong...
Page 56 - This change of affairs in the labor market south, is due to competition between the races in new fields. The labor prince finds himself losing some of his old estate. Industrial education and labor unions for Negroes will not change this condition. They may modify it, but the condition will not be very materially changed. The white man will meet the Negro on the same ground and work for the same wages. That much we may as well take for granted, calculate the consequences of it, and strive by every...
Page 4 - The starting point was the large death-rate of the Negroes ; this led to a study of their condition of life, and the efforts they were making to better that condition. These efforts, when studied, brought clearly to light the hard economic struggle through which the emancipated slave is to-day passing, and the Conference therefore took up one phase of this last year.
Page 77 - Firms 18 Religous societies 10 Secret or other Societies 3 The Negro newspaper has not yet gained an assured footing, but it is rapidly becoming a social force. Nearly all Negro families read them and while the papers are not yet strong enough to mould opinion, they are beginning to play a peculiar part in reflecting it. There exists today no better means of forming, directing and crystalizIng Negro public opinion than by means of the press.
Page 1 - Seminary, Howard University, the Meharry Medical College, and other institutions have kindly joined in this movement and added their efforts to those of the graduates of Atlanta, and have in the last three .years helped to conduct three investigations: One in 1896 into the Mortality of Negroes in Cities; another in 1897 into the General Social and Physical Condition...
Page 59 - AngloSaxon civilization, but almost the civilization itself. It is at least its mainspring to action. Living among such a people is it not obvious that we cannot escape its most powerful motive and survive? To the finite vision, to say the least, the policy of avoiding entrance in the world's business would be suicide to the Negro. Yet as a matter of great account, we ought to note that as good a showing as we have made, that showing is but as pebbles on the shore of business enterprise.
Page 57 - That much we may as well take for granted, calculate the consequences of it, and strive by every means to overcome this falling off in our old-time advantages. We must take in some, if not all, of the wages, turn it into capital, hold it, increase it. This must be done as a means of employment for the thousands who cannot get work from old sources. Employment must be had, and this employment will have to come to Negroes from Negro sources. This phase of the Negro's condition is so easily seen that...
Page 50 - The most advisable work for the immediate future would seem to be: (a) Continued agitation in churches, schools, and newspapers, and by all other avenues, of the necessity of business careers for young people. (b) Increased effort to encourage saving and habits of thrift among the young that we may have more capital at our disposal. (c) The organization in every town and hamlet where colored people dwell, of Negro Business Men's Leagues, and the gradual federation from these of state and national...
Page 57 - ... increase it. This must be done as a means of employment for the thousands who cannot get work from old sources. Employment must be had, and this employment will have to come to Negroes from Negro sources. This phase of the Negro's condition is so easily seen that it needs no further consideration. Negro capital will have to give an opportunity to Negro workmen who will be crowded out by white competition; and when I say Negro workmen I would include both sexes.

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