A Guide to Penzance and Its Neighbourhood, Including the Islands of Scilly: With an Appendix, Containing the Natural History of Western Cornwall, Etc., Etc

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Page 135 - At the extremity of the level seaward, some eighty or one hundred fathoms from the shore, little could be heard of its effects except at intervals, when the reflux of some unusually large wave projected a pebble outward, bounding and rolling over the rocky bottom. But when standing beneath the base of the cliff, and in that part of the mine where but nine feet of rock stood between us and the ocean , the heavy roll of the...
Page 16 - ... beating heart. Amongst the middle and higher classes there was little taste for literature, and still less for science, and their pursuits were rarely of a dignified or intellectual kind. Hunting, shooting, wrestling, cockfighting, generally ending .in drunkenness, were what they most delighted in. Smuggling was carried on to a great extent; and drunkenness, and a low state of morals, were naturally associated with it. Whilst smuggling was the means of acquiring wealth to bold and reckless adventurers,...
Page 152 - Let us make a little chamber, I pray thee, on the wall; and let us set for him there a bed, and a table, and a stool, and a candlestick : and it shall be, when he cometh to us, that he shall turn in thither.
Page 160 - ... natives of the borough, and daughters of seamen, fishermen, or tinners, each of them not exceeding ten years of age, who shall, between ten and twelve o'clock in the forenoon of that day, dance for a quarter of an hour at least, on the ground adjoining the mausoleum, and after the dance, sing the 100th Psalm of the old version "to the fine old tune," to which the same was then sung in St.
Page 75 - The roomy and massive dwelling of the last survivor of an old family, the only grandee of the place, had not very remotely become the chief inn in the village ; yet the faded portraits on some of the walls, the gloomy air of many of the spacious apartments, and, above all, the decaying walls, on parts of which the ivy had grown, of the ancient and now neglected garden — proved that the possessor had been a man of opulence, and, as was still recollected, of influence in the village, almost equal...
Page 44 - was an astonishingly adventurous undertaking. Imagine the descent into a mine through the sea, the miners working at the depth of 17 fathoms below the waves ; the rod of a steam engine, extending from the shore to the shaft, a distance of nearly 120 fathoms, and a great number of men momentarily menaced with an inundation of the sea, which continually drains in no small quantity through the roof of the mine, and roars loud enough to be distinctly heard in it.
Page 56 - A GOOD sword and a trusty hand ! A merry heart and true ! King James's men shall understand What Cornish lads can do. And have they fixed the where and when? And shall Trelawny die? Here's twenty thousand Cornish men Will know the reason why...
Page 85 - ... hundreds of the neighbours, I tooke a strict and impartial examination in my last triennial visitation there. This man, for sixteen years, was forced to walke upon his hands, by reason of the sinews of his leggs were soe contracted that he cold not goe or walke on...
Page 85 - Great Mystery of Godliness," says : — "Of which kind was that noe less than miraculous cure, which, at St Maddern's Well, in Cornwall, was wrought upon a poore cripple ; whereof, besides the attestation of many hundreds of the neighbours, I tooke a strict and impartial examination in my last triennial visitation there. This man, for sixteen years, was forced to walke upon his hands, by reason of the sinews of his leggs were soe contracted that he cold not goe or...
Page 51 - Now, in the former part of the sixth century, during Arthur's reign, there were, in Cornwall, " some remains of Christianity, and some struggles of a few Britons, assisted by the Irish saints, to preserve it ; whereas in Somersetshire, Hampshire, Wiltshire and other places overrun by the Saxons, the Saxon paganism had absolutely...

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