The Diary of James K. Polk During His Presidency, 1845 to 1849: Now First Printed from the Original Manuscript Owned by the Society, Volume 2

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A. C. McClurg, 1910 - Mexican War, 1846-1848
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Page 15 - SATURDAY, 9th May, 1846. — The Cabinet held a regular meeting to-day; all the members present. I brought up the Mexican question, and the question of what was the duty of the administration in the present state of our relations with that country. The subject was very fully discussed. All agreed that if the Mexican forces at Matamoras committed any act of hostility on...
Page 216 - This is my birthday. According to the entry in my father's family Bible I was born on the 2nd day of Nov., 1795, and my mother has told me that the event occurred as near as she could tell about 12 o'clock, Meridian, on that day.
Page 461 - I received a Telegraphic despatch from the office of the Baltimore Sun stating that by a special Express who had come from Pensacola, beating the mail one day, information had been received that the City of Vera Cruz and the castle of San juan de Ulloa had surrendered on the...
Page 101 - ... place in Cabinet between myself and Mr. Buchanan on the Oregon question. This conversation was of so important a character, that I deemed it proper on the same evening to reduce the substance of it to writing for the purpose of retaining it more distinctly in my memory.
Page 462 - Election towards each other that it is impossible to appoint any prominent man or men without giving extensive dissatisfaction to others, and thus jeopardizing the ratification of any Treaty they might make. In this also the Cabinet were agreed. I stated that I preferred that the Secretary of State should be the sole commissioner to negotiate the Treaty, & that I would have no hesitation in deputing him on that special service if the Mexican authorities had agreed to appoint commissioners on their...
Page 330 - ... been transmitted to him from Vera Cruz. The commissioner arrived at the headquarters of the Army a few days afterwards. His presence with the Army and his diplomatic character were made known to the Mexican Government from Puebla on the...
Page 470 - I objected & stated that it constituted no part of the object for which we had engaged in the War. The balance of the Cabinet, though agreeing that it was important, yet concurred with me in opinion that it should not be a sine qua non to the making of a Treaty. Other provisions of the project of the Treaty were considered. It was then agreed that the Cabinet would meet again at jy2 O'Clock this evening, and that in the mean-time Mr.
Page 452 - This afternoon I took a ride on horseback. It is the first time I have mounted a horse for over six months. I have an excellent saddle-horse, and have been much in the habit of taking exercise on horseback all my life, but have been so incessantly engaged in the onerous and responsible duties of my office for many months past that I have had no time to take such exercise.
Page 40 - I had no desire to have any collision with them, but that their course had almost forced it upon me. He left professing to be a good democrat and denying that he was opposed to me or my administration. The truth is that neither Johnson or Jones have been my personal friends since 1839. They were in the Baltimore Convention in 1844, and were not my friends then. I doubt whether any two members of that convention were at heart more dissatisfied with my nomination for the Presidency than they were....
Page 55 - ... until after a fierce and mighty struggle. This city has swarmed with them for weeks. They have spared no effort within their power to sway and control Congress, but all has proved to be unavailing and they have been at length vanquished. Their effort will probably now be to raise a panic (such as they have already attempted) by means of their combined wealth, so as to induce a repeal of the act.