The Early History of St. Louis and Missouri: From Its First Exploration by White Men in 1673 to 1843

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Southwestern Book and Publishing Company, 1870 - Missouri - 170 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
15
III
32
IV
45
V
51
VI
55
VII
65
VIII
70
XIV
103
XV
109
XVI
115
XVII
117
XVIII
128
XIX
135
XX
139
XXI
145

IX
76
X
82
XI
87
XII
92
XIII
98
XXII
151
XXIII
157
XXIV
160
XXV
167

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Page 41 - Natchitoches, and there receive further orders. To disburse your necessary expenses, and to aid your negotiations, you are herewith furnished six hundred dollars' worth of goods, for the appropriation of which you are to render a strict account, vouched by documents to be attested by one of your party. Wishing you a safe and successful expedition, I am, sir, with much respect and esteem, your obedient servant, JAMES WILKINSON.
Page 133 - Missouri," says, on the voyage they were overtaken by a violent storm and several of the vessels stranded. Many horses were lost, but no lives, and they disembarked on the 15th of November at the place of destination. On the 1st of December they received orders from General Zachary Taylor, then commanding in Florida, to march to Okee-cho-bee Lake, one hundred and thirty-five miles inland by the route traveled, in the vicinity of which the whole force of the Seminoles was said to have collected, under...
Page 29 - ... them, he took his position at the bow of the boat, near one of the robbers, a stout, herculean man, who was armed cap-a-pie. Every thing being arranged to his satisfaction, Cacasotte gave the preconcerted signal, and immediately the robber near him was struggling in the waters. With the speed of lightning, he went from one robber to another, and in less than three minutes, he had thrown fourteen of them overboard. Then seizing an oar, he struck on the head those who attempted to save themselves...
Page 28 - Cacasotte, the negro, was a man rather under the ordinary height, very slender in person, but of uncommon strength and activity. The color of his skin and the curl of his hair alone told that he was a negro, for the peculiar characteristics of his race had given place in him to what might be termed beauty. His forehead was finely moulded, his eyes small and sparkling as those of a serpent, his nose aquiline, his lips of a proper thickness; in fact, the whole appearance of the man, joined to his known...
Page 107 - Deming were appointed a committee to draft resolutions expressive of the sense of the meeting. The meeting was ably addressed by the chairman, FS Lovell, Esq., and others.
Page 106 - Esq., a committee of five was appointed to draft resolutions expressive of the sense of the meeting.
Page 29 - Cacasotte was cook, and it was agreed between him and his fellow conspirators, that the signal for dinner should be the signal for action. The hour of dinner at length arrived. The robbers assembled in considerable numbers on the deck, and stationed themselves at the bow and stern, and along the sides, to prevent any rising of the men. Cacasotte went among them with the most unconcerned look and demeanor imaginable. As soon as he perceived...
Page 30 - ... depredations. A long low hut was discovered — the dwelling of the robbers — in which were stored away numerous cases of guns, destined for the fur trade, ammunition and provisions of all kinds. The greater part of these things were put on board the boats, and restored to their respective owners, at St. Louis. This proceeding had the effect of dispersing the robbers, for they were never after heard of. The arrival of ten barges together at St. Louis, was an unusual spectacle, and the year...
Page 28 - The manoeuvre was effected in the course of two days, at an island, which has since been called Beausoliel's island. • The barge had just put ashore — the robbers boarded, and ordered the crew to return down. The men were disarmed, guards were stationed in every part of the vessel, and she was soon under way. Mr. Beausoliel gave himself up to despair. He had spent all he possessed in the purchase of the barge and its cargo, and how that he was to be deprived of them all, he was in agony.
Page 29 - ... of dinner at length arrived. The robbers assembled in considerable numbers on the deck, and stationed themselves at the bow and stern, and along the sides, to prevent any rising of the men. Cacasotte went among them with the most unconcerned look and demeanor imaginable. As soon as he perceived that his comrades had taken the stations he had assigned them, he took his position at the bow of the boat, near one of the robbers, a stout, herculean man, who was armed cap-a-pie. Every thing being arranged...

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