The Quarterly review, Volume 2

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1809
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Page 242 - A Series of Discourses on the Principles of Religious Belief, as connected with Human Happiness and Improvement.
Page 324 - Take counsel, execute judgment; Make thy shadow as the night in the midst of the noonday ; Hide the outcasts ; bewray not him that wandereth. Let mine outcasts dwell with thee, Moab ; Be thou a covert to them from the face of the spoiler : For the extortioner is at an end, the spoiler ceaseth, The oppressors are consumed out of the land.
Page 254 - Lord Russel intriguing with the court of Versailles, and Algernon Sidney taking money from it, I felt very near the same shock as if I had seen a son turn his back in the day of battle.
Page 240 - Spain, he published a pamphlet entitled " A Few Remarks explanatory of the motives which guided the operations of the British army during the late short campaign in Spain," the object of which was to justify the retreat of Sir John Moore, and " to clear his reputation from that shade which by some has been cast over it.
Page 379 - I knew him," says Mr. Burke, in a pamphlet written after their unhappy difference,* " when he was nineteen ; since which time he has risen, by slow degrees, to be the most brilliant and accomplished debater that the world ever saw.
Page 323 - I like it well; I shall die before my heart is soft, or I shall have spoken anything unworthy of myself.
Page 242 - To which are added, Notes from the Spanish and French Versions, and two Appendixes, by the English Editor ; the first, an Account of the Archipelago of Chiloe, from the...
Page 40 - Henaroa, Noowya. The father and mother dying, the brothers said, Let us take our sisters to wife, and become many.
Page 323 - English, or fled, and incorporated themselves with distant and strange nations. In this short but tremendous war, about six hundred of the inhabitants of New England, composing its principal strength, were either killed in battle, or murdered by the Indians. Twelve or thirteen towns were entirely destroyed, and about six hundred buildings, chiefly dwelling houses, were burnt.
Page 240 - Sketches of the Country, Character, and Costume in Portugal and Spain, made during the campaign, and on the route of the British Army, in 1808 and 1809. Engraved and Coloured from the Drawings by the Rev. William Bradford, AB of St.

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