The Pure Food Cook Book: The Good Housekeeping Recipes

Front Cover
Mildred Maddocks
Hearst's International Library, 1914 - Cooking, American - 417 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
14
III
28
IV
41
V
56
VI
71
VII
75
VIII
81
XXI
187
XXII
200
XXIII
202
XXIV
205
XXV
209
XXVI
214
XXVII
237
XXVIII
239

IX
95
X
97
XI
111
XII
113
XIII
123
XIV
125
XV
128
XVI
145
XVII
147
XVIII
171
XIX
173
XX
185
XXIX
265
XXX
267
XXXI
281
XXXII
285
XXXIII
297
XXXIV
317
XXXV
343
XXXVI
357
XXXVII
359
XXXVIII
375
XXXIX
399
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Page 117 - Few grains pepper Chop the corn, add water, and simmer twenty minutes ; rub through a sieve. Scald milk with onion, remove onion, and add milk to corn. Bind with butter and flour cooked together. Add salt and pepper.
Page 117 - ... bread, cut into small squares. Stir occasionally ; and when it boils, serve. Cream of Celery Soup. A pint of milk, a table-spoonful of flour, one of butter, a head of celery, a large slice of onion and small piece of mace. Boil celery in a pint of water from thirty to forty-five minutes ; boil mace, onion and milk together. Mix flour with two table-spoonfuls of cold milk, and add to boiling milk. Cook ten minutes. Mash celery in the water in which it has been cooked, and stir into boiling milk....
Page 161 - Beat a tablespoon of butter to a cream ; add the yolks of three eggs, one at a time, then add three tablespoons of lemon juice, half a teaspoon of salt and a dash of cayenne.
Page 386 - ... until the mixture leaves the sides of the pan. Remove from the fire, cool by beating, and add one at a time four unbeaten eggs, beating thoroughly.
Page 125 - The eggs must be clean, with strong, sound shells, but they should not be washed, as this removes some of the natural mucilaginous coating. They should be put into the preserving fluid, if possible, the same day they are laid, especially in summer, but this is not imperative.
Page 127 - ... comparative ease and uniform results obtained with a little practice if sufficient care is observed. The following methods of preparing soft-cooked and medium-cooked eggs have been found to give uniform results in laboratory tests at the University of Illinois: Using a granite-ware stewpan of one quart capacity, one pint of water was heated over a gas flame; when the water boiled the gas was turned off and an egg which had been kept in a refrigerator was dropped into the water. Without disturbing...
Page 255 - J hour ; add the sugar, salt, beaten egg, and flavoring. Set the dish into a pan of hot water and cook in a moderate oven until the pudding is firm and brown on top (about thirty-five minutes), j cup of small seedless raisins may be added.
Page 126 - As soon as the eggs are packed in the preserving liquid, the receptacle should be carefully sealed with a paraffined or vaselined paper or pasteboard, or with a screw cap or other reliable and tight cover. This is necessary not only to prevent water from volatilizing, which would finally expose the upper eggs to the atmosphere, but also to prevent the carbonic acid of the air from decomposing the silicate. The eggs packed in...
Page 125 - F., but if the proper incubating temperature — about 102.5 degrees F. — is not reached soon and maintained, the egg germs will die and cause the eggs to decay.) Hence the necessity for immediate immersion in the case of fertilized eggs. As soon as the eggs are packed in the preserving liquid, the receptacle should be carefully sealed with a paraffined or vaselined paper or pasteboard, or with a screw cap or other reliable and tight cover. This is necessary not only to prevent water from volatilizing,...

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