The Jeanette: And a Complete and Authentic Narrative Encyclopedia of All Voyages and Expeditions to the North Polar Regions

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Coburn & Cook publishing Company, 1882 - Arctic regions - 840 pages
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Contents

CONTENTS
78
GreenlandCommercial Voyage Under BaffinFotherbyBylotDiscovery of Baffins
82
CAPE HORN
90
Vovage of MunkCasks Burst bv FrostVoyage of the May Flower
95
Other Dutch VoyagesCaptain Raevn Loses his ShipBrutality of a Dutch CaptainWhich Is
105
Attempted Reduction of the Tchuktchis
120
American Side Investigations of Steller Fright of a Native at the Taste of Brandv Reduced
137
WILLIAM SCORESBY 110
153
under Command of Ross and Parry Encounter Esquimaux Phenomenon of Red Snow Enter Lan
161
SIR JOHN Ross
162
SIR WILLIAM EDWARD PAERY
169
Reach Possessi ion Bay Prince Regent Inlet Named Cape York
176
AKA ILLUSTRATIONS
179
Arctic Theater Dailv Occupations Total Absence of the Sun The Appearance of Scurvy Mock
188
SIR JOHN FRANRLIN
199
sources of the Partv Start for the Coppermine The Chief Refuses to Proceed Canoe Party Scut
212
for Winter Procured Start for Cape ScheUgskoi A Sledge Loaded Tenting in the Arctic
229
BARON VON WRANGELL
231
Deposited Attacked by Bears Return to Lower Kolymsk Summer Occupations Almost an Acci
243
Meet Kosmin Importunity of Beresnnoi Generosity of a Jakut Return to Kolymsk
257
SEA BEARS OF SIBERIA
259
nent Anoat Wrunrell Sees the Arctic Danger Meet with Matinschkin A Native Speculator
265
DRESS OF N ATIVE
268
ILIGLIUK
274
Polar Sea Heela and Furv Strait Gluttony Unusual Phenomenon Melville Pentnsula Explored
278
Franklins WifeFranklin Plants His Flag on an Arctic IslandFort Franklin Descend the Mar
288
ESQUIMAUX CHILDS DRESS
293
itionsltuntmTCapturu of a WhaleThe Fury leakln
306
Return Reef Journey Homeward
314
SLEIGH DRAWN BY SINGLE REINDEER
322
e In Winter Quarters Visited by Esquimaux
346
KITCHEN AT FORT RELIANCE
350
dence Akaitcho A SledgeJourney Passing Rapids Capi Richardson Voyage in the Terror
360
Erebus and Terror Last Intelligence of Franklin Franklins Favorite Theory The SearchCom
373
Search for Franklin Last News Three Expeditions Planned Expedition under Richardson
380
ESQUIMAUX OF NORTH AMERICA
386
jectures Return to Fort Confidence Plan tor the Summer lines Expedition Confer with Esqui
397
PERILS OF SLEDGE TRAVEL
413
Signs of Winter Beset Prepared for Danger Wintering in the Arctic Polar Hunting Grounds
422
RELICS OF FRANELIN Full Page
436
WILLIAM MORTON
510
HANS WIFE AND RELATIVES
528
Oil BoatArrival at UpernavikHartstene s SearchKanes Last Days t Uper
534
BavA Winter in the IceArrive on King Williams IslandHudson Discovers a RecordA Mourn
545
CHARLES FRANCIS HALL
547
INNUIT WOMANS HEAD DRESS
569
CHAPTER LXIV
574
CHAPTER LXV
589
L HAYES
591
THE LITTLE AUK
604
POINT ISABELLA
619
EAST GREENLAND VILLAGE
633
CHAPTER LXX
640
GRAVE OF HALL
647
VoyageEbierbintr and PookoolitoA Difference of OpinionThe Highest PointLast Words
650
TRANSPORTING WOOD FOR THE HOUSE
667
English Expedition under NaresThe Alert and Discovery Boring Through the PackThe
674
GRAVE OF LIEUT IRVING
689
of Raes TestimonyGrave of Lieut IrvingHoinage from America and Great Britain
691
BuyVovage to the Mouth of the ObiSamoyed TentsA Problem in Navigation SolvedNor
700
THE CLOUD BERRY
702
Problem SolvedThe Northernmost Point of AsiaAnimal LifeThe Vega and Lena Part Com
711
HonestvNordenskiolds Excursion to Pidlin Celebration of Christmas visitors at the Vega
719
AURORAL DISPLAY SEEN FROM THE VEGA Full Page
726
THE JEANVETTE 737S
739
LIEUT GEORGE W DE_ONG
749
Stock of DogsCivilized CostumesA Volcanic Region A Hunting Party from the Jeannttie
755
JEROME J COLLINS
756
Jeannette Firmly Frozen in Danenhowers StatementThe Winter Night BeginsHerald Island
766
LIEUT JOHN W DANENIIOWER
769
LIEUT CHARLES W CHIPP
782
Soundings Extracts from the Jeannettes LogThe Ice BoredA Party of ExplorersDiscoveries
791
PARLIAMENT HOUSE AT REIRIAVIR
801
Making for the LandCape EmmaThe Three BoatLoadsThaddeus IslandThe Adventure
803
NEWCOMB
811
EXTERIOR OF CONVICT HUT IN SIBERIA
821
MoundThe Dog for SupperEricksens Hands FrozenFried Dog MeatThird Hand TeaDe
824
GRAVE OF DE LONG AND PARTY Full Page
830
THREE SHIPS 28
837

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Page 158 - O'ER the glad waters of the dark blue sea, Our thoughts as boundless, and our souls as free, Far as the breeze can bear, the billows foam, Survey our empire, and behold our home ! These are our realms, no limits to their sway — Our flag the sceptre all who meet obey.
Page 47 - We are as near to heaven by sea as by land. Reiterating the same speech, well beseeming a soldier resolute in Jesus Christ, as I can testify he was.
Page 40 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea -shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Page 152 - The prospect," says the distinguished naturalist, " was most extensive and grand. A fine sheltered bay was seen to the east of us ; an arm of the same on the north-east ; and the sea, whose glassy surface was unruffled by a breeze, formed an immense expanse on the west ; the icebergs, rearing their proud crests almost to the tops of the mountains between which they were lodged, and defying the power of the solar beams, were scattered in various directions about the sea-coast and in the adjoining...
Page 436 - There must have been a number of telescopes, guns (several of them double-barrelled), watches, compasses, &c., all of which seem,- to have been broken up, as I saw pieces of these different articles with the natives, and I purchased as many as possible, together with some silver spoons and forks, an Order of Merit in the form of a star, and a small silver plate engraved
Page 265 - Upon the whole, it was impossible for us not to receive a very unfavourable impression of the general behaviour and moral character of the natives of this part of Hudson's Strait, who seem to have acquired, by an annual intercourse with our ships for nearly a hundred years, many of the vices which unhappily attend a first intercourse with the civilized world, without having imbibed any of the virtues or refinements which adorn and render it happy.
Page 214 - He launched into the stream with the line round his middle, but when he had got a short distance from the bank, his arms became benumbed with cold, and he lost the power of moving them ; still he . persevered, and, turning on his back, had nearly gained the opposite bank, when his legs also' became powerless, and to our infinite alarm we beheld him sink. We instantly hauled upon the line and he came again on the surface, and was gradually drawn ashore in an almost lifeless state.
Page 147 - One of our seamen sold his stock alone for eight hundred dollars ; and a few prime skins, which were clean, and had been well preserved, were sold for one hundred and twenty each. The whole amount of the •value, in specie and goods, that was got for the furs, in both ships, I am confident did not fall short of two thousand pounds sterling...
Page 116 - Knight was given command of the expedition, and was "with the first opportunity of wind and weather, to depart from Gravesend on his intended voyage, and by God's permission, to find out the strait of Anian, in order to discover gold and other valuable commodities to the northward.
Page 332 - The attention is troubled to fix on anything amid such confusion ; still must it be alive, that it may seize on the single moment of help or escape which may occur. Yet with all this, and it is the hardest task of all, there is nothing to be acted, — no effort to be made, — he must be patient, as if he were unconcerned or careless, waiting, as he best can, for the fate, be it what it may, which he cannot influence or avoid.

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